1 Happy Diabetic


(meme) #1

I like to watch his videos---ONE OF THE MOST IMP. DIABETIES QUESTIONS--to ask yoursef,do you accept your diabeties.......The video leads me to wonder how do you know you have for sure....how long does this take....once you have accepted it,will d care be better and stay that  way ???


(sarahslp) #2

I guess I never went through that typical teenage rebellion where I didn't want to admit I had D, so I didn't test or take insulin. So, I guess I've always accepted that it's real and taken my insulin. But ... I still go through periods in my life where I'm very p*ssed off and angry about it, and others where I'm more accepting. But, I'm ready for a cure any time time now either way --- come on cure!!!! (:


(sarahslp) #3

Also, to better answer your question, I've gone through periods in my life where my control was better than others even though I knew the D wasn't going away. My friends w/ D seem to have gone through these phases too -- usually development ones, but also as an adult...


(meme) #4

Thanks Sarah,my teen has always taken her insulin,but she is not one to talk about d.If I bring it up-she will give a quick answer and be off to the next thing.Does this mean that she does not accept her d -or do you think it's just her way of dealing with d ?


(sarahslp) #5

[quote user="meme"]

Thanks Sarah,my teen has always taken her insulin,but she is not one to talk about d.If I bring it up-she will give a quick answer and be off to the next thing.Does this mean that she does not accept her d -or do you think it's just her way of dealing with d ?

[/quote]

I don't know, but for me personally, I never want to talk about complications. Ignoring the idea helps me cope.

I guess if she's taking good care of herself and knows you are there for her if she needs to talk, I wouldn't worry about it. (:


(Katrina R) #6

[quote user="meme"]

Thanks Sarah,my teen has always taken her insulin,but she is not one to talk about d.If I bring it up-she will give a quick answer and be off to the next thing.Does this mean that she does not accept her d -or do you think it's just her way of dealing with d ?

[/quote]

 

well Im a teen, and I dont really talk about my D. but its not because i dont accept it. I do it more or less because D isnt my whole life. and I like many things, and I dont like being always talked to about my diabetes, because it can sometimes be hard when people dont talk to you about normal things. cuz Im just a regular teen and some people cant just realize that.. Im not sure if this is the case with your daughter, but Im pretty sure its fairly close, cause as you know, all of we teens are headstrong, and awesome :P


(sydneynicole) #7

whatvideo?


(kneazle_lady) #8

I am guessing that most parents want their young ones to be happy, but adolescence is not a happy time. And some types of happiness, I think, are only available when you have been through dark times. I love so much of my life...I may grouse, but I know without this illness that I could not see things for how wonderful they are.

I will not ever be happy about being type 1, however. I don't align happiness (not saying that you are) with acceptance. You can dislike something strongly and still accept it. You have the courage to do what you can, and you work for the wisdom to learn what you can't do, no matter how much you may want to...just paraphrasing the Serenity prayer. I'm not a preachy person or a religious person even, but I like the notion of this particular one.

I still say that even though it utterly stinks (mostly because of dim witted people who know nothing about T1, really, in my case), T1 revealed some aspect of existence that makes the lovely things lovelier than they may have been otherwise. I think it may for parents of T1's but since I'm not a parent of a T1, I couldn't say for sure.

And acceptance...heck...acceptance is living, getting up and checking, doing the insulin, going to the infernal doctor, getting the blah, etc. done...it's not like there's really a choice. I take the viewpoint that any action on behalf of T1 is an act of acceptance, even if it is accompanied by a long stream of profanity, which is sometimes the only natural response.

And you are a hero for being a parent of a T1, in my book. I think it was harder for my family in some ways than it ever was for me, and I have had some rough times w/T1...because at least I was living it...they had to watch. Take care of yourself no matter what goes down...I do my best, and I count on my family to take care of themselves as well. It's no longer like I depend on them, one way, no matter what...we count on each other.


(meme) #9

Thank you all so much-it does help to hear what others think !--and Sydney,I watch his videos on youtube-he has good videos !


(BrianPQuinn) #10

In my fourteen years of being a diabetic I truly only started to accept things a little more than a year ago. I had a life changing expereince two novembers ago and slowly I started to adapt and adjust to the D. It takes each of us different amounts of time. It is odd that it took me so long, but sometimes it is a wakeup call that gets us. I am just glad I survived the experience. I truly think that it depends though on when the diagnosis happens. The younger one is it seems to be "easier" where as for many diagnosed in the teenage years thinks seem to at times be a little more turbulent. I could be wrong though.