Access to Flu Nasal Spray: DENIED


(alexandra) #1

i went to the doctor for a pulled muscle in my leg and my mom decided to get me a flu shot. Last year I got the nasal spray instead so I asked if I could have that instead. THEY SAID NO! Apparently it's because there is a bit of live virus in the nasal spray and so diabetics aren't allowed to have it! Don't we get stabbed enough?


(system) #2

I don't think getting stabbed one more time during the day is really that big of a deal...better than getting the flu because they screwed up and there's a live virus in the spray...(if you're gonna get the flu vaccine at all that is)


(smddance10) #3

thats weird i got the mist this year . . .


(LauraJ) #4

I got the mist today! They said that the only people who should not get it is those with asthma.  This was the first time I have ever gotten the Flu "vaccine".  I chose the spray over the shot because it is more realistic.  You dont get the flu through your arm muscle; you get the flu through your nose, mouth and eyes.  I like the idea of the spray a lot and I hope they reconsider letting you get it.


(kissaboo12) #5

Yea, I've had mist before. I prefer the shots though, they work better and are easier because the mist makes you sneeze a lot. Also, I have athsma now so I have to get the shot but other than that, I think it's weird that he said no to the mist...


(Barbottina) #6

I know that people with Diabetes cannot get the mist form of the H1N1 vaccine because of of the live virus in it. The shot contains inactive virus instead. The same probably applies to the flu shot as well? I've always had shots.


(system) #7

it's not supposed to be enough virus to make you sick, just enough for your body to build up an immunity to it. it shouldn't matter how it's delivered (shot/mist) because the virus just needs to be introduced into the system so you can create antibodies for it.


(Barbottina) #8

My thought is...why risk it if the shot is considered safer?

Here's an extract from http://www.cdc.gov/FLU/about/qa/nasalspray.htm

Who can be vaccinated with the nasal-spray flu vaccine LAIV (FluMist®)?

LAIV (FluMist®) is approved for use in healthy* people 2-49 years of age who are not pregnant.

Who should not be vaccinated with the nasal-spray flu vaccine LAIV (FluMist®)?
  • People less than 2 years of age
  • People 50 years of age and over
  • People with a medical condition that places them at high risk for complications from influenza, including those with chronic heart or lung disease, such as asthma or reactive airways disease; people with medical conditions such as diabetes or kidney failure; or people with illnesses that weaken the immune system, or who take medications that can weaken the immune system.
  • Children <5 years old with a history of recurrent wheezing
  • Children or adolescents receiving aspirin
  • People with a history of Guillain-Barré syndrome, a rare disorder of the nervous system
  • Pregnant women
  • People who have a severe allergy to chicken eggs or who are allergic to any of the nasal spray vaccine components.
Should the nasal-spray flu vaccine LAIV (FluMist®) be given to patients with chronic diseases other than those specifically listed above?

No. The nasal-spray flu vaccine is approved for use only in healthy* people 2-49 years of age who are not pregnant.


(Eric_Carpenter) #9

I think the general benefits of the mist are reduced risk of injury to the patient and practitioner.  Fewer needles leads to less risk of accidental scratches or pokes after the injection leading to less direct blood transmission of germs.  No need to use sharps containers either, so fewer injuries later (I have a friend whose dad works on the motors in trash compactors, he is very worried about the risks from casually discarded needles).  When I was little nurses had to hold me down to get vaccines, and I was diabetic.  So a little saved time and panic too.