Am begging for your help please!

(Ibrah) #1

Hellow guys,I was diagonised with 19 years,I am student studying health university clinical courses please I need your help and support my blood sugar is getting worse now my fasting blood sugar morning is up to 2o please what can I do to regulate???

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(joe) #2

@Ibrah hello. no need to beg. lots of us have high blood sugar once in a while.

it says you were diagnosed at 19 years… can I ask diagnosed as what? Diabetes (I am going to generalize here so no offence TO ANYONE for any reason) has many forms, the most typical are Type 2, a form of diabetes where you cannot use the insulin you make, and after a while, you also don’t make enough insulin. Type 2 is treated with restrictive diet, exercise, and sometimes weight loss. T2 is also treated with pills, to help you absorb insulin, pills to help you make more insulin, and sometimes injections of insulin (insulin is a hormone and is necessary for the metabolism of carbohydrates in what you eat).

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease, where your body can typically use the insulin, but your body stops making it. The main treatment of Type 1 is insulin replacement therapy, and by controlling diet and exercise.

If you have type 1, you have to inject insulin.

Eating anything with carbohydrates in it makes your blood sugar go up. insulin and exercise (plus insulin) makes your blood sugar go down, you use a blood sugar test meter before every meal and at about 2 hours after every meal with a test around bedtime for good measure.

I find the best reference for type 1 diabetes is a book called “Think Like a Pancreas”. available on amazon.com however I see that you are form Tanzania, so it may be more difficult for you to get this book.

Hope you are getting medical assistance.

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(Ibrah) #3

Thanks Joe for your reply I was diagonised as type one diabete am using insulin therapy which I inject twice a day but still my blood sugar too high on today fasting I found 23.4mml\g

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(joe) #4

Hello @Ibrah, there are many formulations of insulin. In the United States, the most common form of insulin replacement therapy for people with Type 1 diabetes, is a shot of glargine insulin, which is a long acting “all day” insulin and a shot of fast acting (insulin lispro, ) for each and every time you eat carbohydrates. it is common to inject 4-7 times a day with this regimen.

For recently diagnosed, there are mixtures of insulin (70/30) that have a fast acting insulin and an intermediate insulin.

If you have high blood sugar, for a long time, it is best to start taking notes and go to your doctor as soon as possible. The doctor may change your number of shots, may change the amount of each shot, or may change the insulin formulation.

Please do not change your shot or your amount without a doctor, unless you are very comfortable making your own decisions. I have had Type 1 for 40 years, and I am at a point where I decide how much insulin to take and when - but I have had a lot of practice.

For prolonged 23.4 mmol/g you need to drink large amounts of water, avoid eating carbohydrates, ensure your insulin has not “cooked” (been above 37 or below 0C) if necessary or if you begin vomiting, you need to go to a hospital.

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(Ibrah) #5

Thanks much Joe I have get something on your advice but another thing I don’t know is to count amount of carbs and the dose required

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(Abby) #6

Hey @Ibrah–
If you haven’t found a good endocrinologist, get one ASAP. It sounds like your current insulin dosages aren’t working–you probably need new ratios or more frequent doses. (I myself take fast-acting insulin every time I eat, and long-acting once a day.) Your endo will be able to come up with an individual plan that fits your body and your needs.

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(joe) #7

@Ibrah you need a reference for carbohydrates, since you have access to the internet - my recommend Calorie King. click here https://www.calorieking.com/

put in a food - such as “apple” pick the serving size and it tells you how many carbohydrates. You count carbohydrates by adding up all of your foods with carbohydrates. This is counting carbohydrates Typically for diabetes, your doctor gives you a maximum meal time total carbohydrates. for example Breakfast 30 grams, lunch 40 grams, dinner 30 grams, snack 15 grams… . you will eventually know these by heart.

When I was a child, I was taught that a small apple, a small banana, a slice of bread, a fist full of rice, all have 15 grams of carbohydrates. 15 grams was called an “exchange” because I could exchange a fruit for a slice of bread. I was allowed 2 exchanges for breakfast, lunch and for dinner, 1 exchange for snacks after breakfast and after lunch.

fruit, cereals from grains, rice and breads make up most of your carbohydrates but there are carbohydrates in vegetables. There are MANY carbohydrates in soft drinks such as Pepsi. just count them all equally for now.

it is important, if you have prolonged higher blood sugar, to restrict the amount of total carbohydrates, and if your blood sugar control is reasonable, to try to keep your carbohydrates close to the same for meat to meal, for predictability… if you always eat 30 grams for breakfast, and your blood sugar is in good range, then continue to do so.

Finding out how much insulin for each gram of carbohydrates is “trial and error”. first you have to know if you are on a mixture of insulin. If you are on pure - such as “R” or insulin Lispro, you can give an amount based on how many carbohydrates you eat.

for me I use 1 unit of insulin lispro for each 10 grams of carbs. You must not use my numbers unless your doctor says it’s ok. For myself, I do not have to eat the 30 grams at breakfast, I can have 10 or 40 and adjust my insulin. This is not applicable to insulin mixtures.

hope this is helpful.

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(Ibrah) #8

Hellow @joe I real appreciaate your advice you have totally encourage me as I was out of mind due to my prolonged blood sugar I think from now I will successful manage and control my bs thanks alot Joe GOD bless you

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(Ibrah) #9

Hellow @bookwormnerd13 thank you for your reply but I have not understand the meaning of ASP

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(Abby) #10

Oh @Ibrah sorry, didn’t mean to be confusing! That means As Soon As Possible. :slight_smile:

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(Ibrah) #11

Oooh thanks madam I get u now! English is problem!!!

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(Ibrah) #12

Wish to get your email for more contact

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(Abby) #13

My email is abigaelparrish13@gmail.com. I’d love to chat more with you!

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(Elizabeth) #14

Hi Ibrah. Great suggestions from others. Don’t distress. It may just take some time to figure out the right regimen for your body. It’ll happen. I, like some others have had type 1 diabetes for more than 40 years. Counting carbs and figuring carb amount to insulin ratio is critical for good diabetes management. Yes…The Calorie King book is great for figuring out carbs but I like the actual physical book as opposed to the downloadable one. It compact in size and has more information. Amazon carries it. Stress can significantly spike your blood sugars to uncontrollable levels so try hard to keep stress under control ( it’s hard not to stress with life as hectic as it is these days, right?). Stress releases cortisol ( a stress hormone) and adrenaline which converts the hormones to glucose. Also if you exercise be mindful of your blood sugar level prior to exercising. For me, if my blood sugar is high but between 200-300 I don’t give insulin but take a brisk walk for 30+ minutes and drink lots of water. This will likely burn off the excess sugar, and is good for stress and overall well-being anyway. If it is above 300 check for ketones and give yourself a correction of insulin based on your doctors advice. It’s Important though to get in touch with your doctor before starting or changing your diabetic regimen. Also, insulin only lasts about a month. After a month it doesn’t work very well which will cause blood sugars to spike. Diabetes is crazy to manage but you’ll figure it. Hang in there!

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(Janice) #15

Hi Ibrah, this sounds like “dawn Phenomenon” that means if it has been a while (4 hours or more) since you have eaten your liver assumes yo are starving and will dump sugar in your blood stream to keep you alive… The way to stop this is to eat a little something before you go to bed, IE: crackers and p-butter just a few. This keeps the liver from flooding your system with sugar. This phenom. can happen if your a diabetic or not, the liver doesn’t care just doesn’t want you to starve . Hope this helps, let me know. Jan

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(Ibrah) #16

Hie Janice I first thank you for ur reply ithink this is helpful I real appreciate the advice and support am getting from you thanks!!!

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(Ibrah) #17

Hi @Elizabeth67 I thinks this is helpful since I joined TID society I have start at least to manage m y BG compared to the fast time and I was so happy to hear there are people who have live with diabetes more than 60years thanks

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