Another needle?


(Drewspitboss) #1

I feel so helpless.  My son recently had his immunizations updated for school.  Now they want a Lead panel included.

At 5, I can't explain to him properly, yes I have to poke you 3x's a day.  Yes, you still have to get your normal 3 month blood panel for your Endo. Oh and YES, now we need you too give us more blood for you school! This has been the worst 1 month period since his diagnosis.

It's needle overload!  Every time he needs a non-insulin needle we basically have to chase him down, sit on him & hope we can keep him still enough that it doesn't break off in him!  I feel so sorry for him.  I've actually taken a new needle & stuck myself so I can use the "see, Mommies getting one too"line.  Ok, ouch, I can't do that anymore!!! He's finally give in to the dailies.  We've been advised against the pump & I agree for now for him.

I don't know, I don't even know if I'm asking for advice, I think I'm just venting!


(Lucas mom) #2

One thing to help with the lead test...if it can wait until his next A1c, they can draw at the same time.  Then again, my endo still sends us for the blood drawn A1c, I hear some now do it with a finger stick.  Anyway, if I can help it , all other blood tests are done at the same time as the A1c.

 

C


(Madisonkim) #3

Hi I feel for you and your son My daughter is 3 going on 4 in april. She was diagnosed in nov2008 and she gets two injections daily. We started with syringes and now are using pens which means she gets two injections twice a day. It has been a constant battle full out wrestling matches. My husband works during the week so I have to see if any neighbours are home to hold my daughter. I applied to get a home support nurse to hold her during injections but their answer back was that was not their role they would be willing to come and do the injections. That is not going to help as I need to keep up the practice of it. So I am wondering how long did it take your son to not fight you? It has been over two months now and I am exhausted physically and mentally. It is hard seeing the fear in my daughters eyes.


(peteandjulesmom) #4

Maybe if you had a nurse come for a short time to do the injections, it would help because it would give you a break--and you can always practice whe your daughter is calmer--it will happen eventually!!

For my son it is a battle of the wills everyday. He is 5 years old, and though he eventually gives in--it takes a lot of talking him into it every day!!We have the same conversations over and over--I say, Lets go wash your hands Peter. He says I don't want to wash my hands--then the battle begins--Sometimes he's pretty mad and he cries because he's not getting what he wants(which is of course not to wash his hands, or to do his fingerstick, or his insulin).

He was dx in May of 2008, but even though he's gotten much better with the injections(and so have we by the way)--its still hard for him because he just wants his diabetes to go away and so do we.

It has been an incredible lesson in patience for me and my husband-- And if you look on the bright side--thats not such a bad thing-

Mom of Pete and Jules


(mismidge) #5

We do just a finger poke for A1C checks as well. We have to go and get a full blood work up every so often though. I have posted in the past how we helped Ethan when he was five and just getting shots. Maybe it will help. We set up a sticker chart for him. We made him part of the process.. you know, buying the poster board, picking the stickers and letting him know it was all for him. He liked that part. We explained that he got a sticker for a shot in his arm, because that was his if I have to spot, and two stickers for the scary spots. After he reached a goal 7 or so stickers we would go and let him pick a prize from the pharmacy across the street. Like a dollar or two toy or treat. It helped us get through alot of hard things. Not crying when mom and dad would leave school and stuff like that. The key is keep goals short and extend them as time goes on. you will be able to switch the chart from shots to something non diabetic and then it will be gone. It was the greatest tool we had. I know all kids are different and lets face it we all would be sick of the pokes too. This is a good place to vent and get good advice. You have every right to feel like this is enough. It is enough...enough..enough.. Tell them he needs a brake. Good luck I hope I have helped.


(car1olyn) #6

When my daughter was fist diagnosed at age 3 almost 2 years ago, she would scream and cry and run and hide in the closet when we had to check her or give her a shot. We started giving her quarters for each check/shot combination. She saved up her money and bought herself a fish from the pet store. Then her sister was diagnosed 2 weeks later (age 5.) The older one has always been OK with shots and finger sticks, so it made my younger one OK with it too.

Do you know anyone else with diabetes that is close by? A friend, relative, another kid his age? Maybe if your son saw that he's not the only kid doing this, it would help calm him down about it? And if it was an older kid, maybe he'd think that it was even cool to do it? Or he could see how to act like a "big kid" too? My two kids are in school with 2 other girls, both in first grade, with diabetes (in a small school) and one of the other girls was diagnosed last year mid-year. The nurse said it was really nice for her to have the other girls with her at snack time and bus check to show her that it was really OK...


(Lisa kasabian) #7

My son was diagnosed at 24 months and is now 10 years old so he does not know life any other way.  However, one thing we have always done which seems to have paid off, is we do not disrupt him from his activity to do a poke or insulin.  We bring it to him and do it right where he is with as little interruption as possible.  Sometimes when he was young he would not even know we did it.  It got to the point that if I sat down by him he would stick out a finger and keep playing. 

I also like the rewards idea mentioned by the other responses.  Setting a goal and making him focus on that instead of the shot may help.  I also have quiet heart to heart conversations with my son where I tell him the truth of the disease, tell him he needs to do these things to stay healthy, talk about cures and educate him.  He needs to know there is no option and trust you.

We go to Childrens Memorial for our A1C and it's a finger stick.  Maybe you can ask your doctor about this.

I know what you are feeling when you say "Another Needle?".  It hurts me each time I inject my son.  What helped me was to have other people around me trained as well.  My husband, my sister in law, the daycare teachers and school nurse all can do insulin.  Daily I do 1 shot, my husband does 2 and the nurse at school does one (if needed).  If you aren't doing them all yourself it may not be as hard for you.

Hang in there, he is only 5 it will get easier for him.

 


(Drewspitboss) #8

Hi,It took me the better part of a yr to get him to do his own testing.  We made a guessing game of tht numbers.  As far as fighting us for the insulin, it took less than 2yrs but even now he still has those moments.  Especially when he's doing something he really wants to do.  Our problem now is getting immunizations, flu shots, lipid tests, etc.

The one mistake we made was injecting his arms, mostly because we could catch him in action.  Now we have a hard time injection him in any other area. 


(Drewspitboss) #9

Hi,It took me the better part of a yr to get him to do his own testing.  We made a guessing game of tht numbers.  As far as fighting us for the insulin, it took less than 2yrs but even now he still has those moments.  Especially when he's doing something he really wants to do.  Our problem now is getting immunizations, flu shots, lipid tests, etc.

The one mistake we made was injecting his arms, mostly because we could catch him in action.  Now we have a hard time injection him in any other area. 


(mommyofocean) #10

Hello everyone I thought I would put my 2 sence in, With Ocean we have to draw blood every 2-3 months and we use maxaline cream or an emla cream and freeze the arm 20 min before her blood work. And she basically feels nothing. She still hates going but makes it a bit easier.

Carolyn


(patienceaz) #11

I understand your feelings. My son was DX when he had just turned 4 and it was a trauma to do the finger pokes as well as the shots. Since then ( he is 6) he is fine with the finger pokes and we are on the pump. We use emla cream 2-3 hrs on his skin before inserting the needle for his pump. We also use the distraction methos and let him tell us when to insert the needle. Sometimes it takes him 15 seconds to day go and other times it takes 1 min, but it gives him a little control over the whole process.

In the begining we drew a picture of him and circled the areas where we could inject, arms, legs, tummy, but and he could choose the shot site, then we would let him make an X where we put the shot and next time he would have to pick a new location ( rotation sched) we would give him a point for every shot without running away and hiding and then after 10 points he could get a matchbox car ( $1-$2). This motivated him to stand still and be safe. After awhile we phased out of the rewards and the picture method. We also were firm when explaining to him that the shots were imperative to his health and feeling good so he could keep playing.

My son was on multiple shots a day, 2 of lantus and apidra anytime he ate , as well as more shots for corrections = 5-10 shots a day. when we went to the pump he resisted for about 3 months, but now he prefers the pump, b/c he can eat when he wants and has less shots.

Hope this helps a little.


(rmeadowsaprn) #12

I think to myself so many times "What a raw deal!" Not only for my daughter but the children I take care of as a Nurse Practitioner. But, in time, all children with a disability or that have to experience more pain then the normal child on a day to day basis, develop a wisdom that is very unique and courageous. But it still kills me knowing that my daughter and so many other children just have to learn to accept their diseases and be courageous in the first place. Not fair.