Books that have helped you?


(clh983) #1

I am a librarian at a public library and am looking into getting some new books for our library system on T1 diabetes (most of ours that have anything to do with T1 are at least 10 years old).  I have checked for reviews in professional literature, but I haven't found any helpful reviews.

So are there any books (medical guides, memoirs, etc) that you have found informative and helpful?

Thanks!


(joe) #2

"Think Like a Pancreas", Gary Scheiner, 2004 Marlowe & Company

"Diabetes Burnout", William H. Polonsky, 1999 ADA

"Pumping Insulin", John Walsh and Ruth Roberts, 2006 Torrey Pines Press

 

=)


(type1at18) #3

[quote user="Joe"]

"Pumping Insulin", John Walsh and Ruth Roberts, 2006 Torrey Pines Press

[/quote]

I second that!


(Joanie) #4

Joe:  Those are the exact three I would put down too!!!!


(Daniels Mom) #5

My favorite book is:  "Type 1 Diabetes - A Guide for Children, Adolescents, Young Adults-- and Their Caregivers" by Ragnar Hanas, MD, PHD

The only problem may be that someone may check it out and not bring it back.  It is more of a "reference type" book than a "read from beginning to end" type book.

 


(JenStepan) #6

Last year I read the book "Sugar Free Me" by Naomi Kingery.  It is very good, and somewhat teaches about diabetes but mostly talks about the emotional effect with diabetes and gives standpoints from diabetics, parents, and friends. It is more of an inspirational type diabetes book.

Jen


(clh983) #7

These are all really wonderful suggestions!  Thank you so much!

Christie


(brian9549) #8

Stop the Roller Coaster is a good one too, it is also by John Walsh and Ruth Roberts.


(DiabeticandProud) #9

I wrote a diabetes book that will be published soon, I would love to get some feedback  from other diabetics, so if anyone would read it and tell me what you think message me please!


(Trevor) #10

[quote user="Jennifer"]

Last year I read the book "Sugar Free Me" by Naomi Kingery.  It is very good, and somewhat teaches about diabetes but mostly talks about the emotional effect with diabetes and gives standpoints from diabetics, parents, and friends. It is more of an inspirational type diabetes book.

Jen

[/quote]

Why does the title "Sugar Free Me" send one of those suspicious shivers down my spine?

I'm guessing it's just my personal view of diabetes not needing to be 'sugar free' but 'sugar conscious'.

My personal recommendation for book choices is more an exclusion list than a specific book reference list:

  • First off, anything that can be labeled as 'gimmicky'. Books that cater to diabetes as something that needs to be cured in X days. Or making it seem like you're not diabetic at all. Any reference to diabetes in a sense of 'solving the diabetes problem".
  • Secondly, cookbooks. There may be some good diabetic cookbooks out there, but most of them are relabled dietary cookbooks designed to decrease caloric and carbohydrate content, increase fiber content, and consequently reduce flavor.

On the positive side, personal experience books can be awesome, provided the author isn't caught up in gimmicks or the 'generic' view of diabetes. Utility books are pretty sweet too, especially if you're a fan of carb counting (which I think is pretty much standard practice nowadays). Books that basically give you good estimates of the amount of carbs in common foods. Usually it's all tables and lists, and not easy reading material though. ;)

Part of the reason I don't have many awesome suggestions for books is I tend to steer clear of them myself. Personal preference and all that. :)


(Anonymous) #11

OK, so this is the opposite of what you're asking for :) However, if I were you I'd avoid putting in One Last Dance by Lurlene McDaniel. It is a great book, but because it was written back when treatments were different the point of view of diabetes seems a bit askew to me. She actually started writing because her son was diagnosed with juvenile diabetes ;)

 


(system) #12

While not specifically about type 1 diabetes, I recently read "Life Disrupted: Getting Real About Chronic Illness in Your Twenties and Thirties" by Laurie Edwards.  And I definitely recommend it!  The author has wonderful perspective and just the right dash of humour.  Insightful, informative and inspirational.


(Baileysmom) #13

My favorite is "Cheating Destiny: Living with Diabetes" by James Hirsch.  It is a thorough discussion of Type 1 (with some inclusion of Type 2), written by a T1 with a brother (who is an endocrinologist) and son who are also T1.  I gave a copy of it to my daughter's endo and she loved it.  It covers everything - history of insulin discovery, treatment, research, personal/family impact, development of the JDRF.  The author is a journalist and the book is very readable. 


(system) #14

I read a brand new book that just came out that totally gives answers in an easy to read format.

THE REAL-LIFE GUIDE TO DIABETES: Managing Diabetes in Today's Hectic World by Hope S. Warshaw and Joy Pape

it just came out, and is up to date with new information.