College Freshman


(type1at18) #1

I am currently a freshman in college

I am also newly diagnosed so I've been learning all the ropes as I go


(Gina) #2

Are you away at school?


(type1at18) #3

yea I'm about 2.5 hours away from home

but i'm going home this weekend! I haven't been home in a month and a half so I'm really excited :D


(Julie) #4

I am also a freshman, and am about 2 hours away from home, but I have had diabetes for 11 years now, so its going pretty smoothly.   


(type1at18) #5

it was somewhat difficult for me to be in a new environment and be learning everything to do with diabetes. Eating food that I didn't prepare was what I struggled with first but then I'm so much more active now walking to classes and everything so I had to deal with that. Plus I'm still in honeymoon so everything is constanly changing.

But right now I feel like I have a lot under control.


(GingerVieira) #6

Hey Melissa,

 

Wow, you were diagnosed right before starting college? That's too many transitions at once! Good for you for taking it on.

 

I'm Ginger -- Gina and I both also write for HealthCentral.com -- I wanted to show you a few posts from other kids over at Health Central's site  www.diabeteens.com.

 

Diabetes in college definitely comes with different challenges than Diabetes in high school, because there is so much more freedom in college, so fewer rules, no parents, more alcohol and drugs, etc.

 

Here's a couple article that you find helpful:

 

Diabetes & Alcohol

Carbohydrate Counting - Quiz

When Diabetes's Challenges Become Really Overwhelming

A post from a teen blogger on some of the non-school related challenges

TALKING TO YOUR TEACHERS about your diabetes


I hope some of this is helpful to you, because you're taking on a lot right now and I'm truly impressed! I think you've got the right idea though, keep trying to learn the ropes, educate yourself about the disease and about your body and keep your chin up!

 

-Ginger


(type1at18) #7

Thanks so much

I always enjoy researching and reading other people's stories


(bwinston33) #8

Yeah I'm in a similar position - was diagnosed a couple months ago - about a  week before leaving to go halfway across the country for my freshman year.  I learned the basics at the hospital that day, but within a few days I was gone, and haven't been back home since.  It's certainly a rough transition at first, and there are definitely a lot of things that now set me apart from just about everybody else, but I think the biggest challenge is mental.  Once you put yourself in the right mindset and force yourself to accept what's happened and smile anyway, then it's not so bad.  Instead of feeling sorry for myself about the things I don't get to do, I tell myself to shrug and deal with what I can do.  So yes, maybe one has to skip the frat houses... and rent a movie instead.  Go to the "FREE PIZZA DINNER!"... but grab your meal beforehand.  Keep track of blood sugars incessantly... and make them into a cool Excel graph/spreadsheet while you're at it.  


(GingerVieira) #9

Woo! An excel graph sheet? Geez, good for you! I've yet to get that down to business! I admire your attitude, though, "smile anyway" and make the most of every other opportunity you have ('cause there are SO many others!!!!). ANd of course, it doesn't mean life with diabetes is supposed to be peachy keen just because you've accepted it as part of your life, but still, you know that when it's challenging, you just need to be patient, take a deep breath and keep going.

 

 

Ginger

www.diabeteens.com

 

 


(Dylan404) #10

Lol I can understand exactly what you mean by all the walking, my first week I went low nearly every day from all the walking. Glad to hear you're doing well though. If I can offer any advice I'd say make sure you have a way to de-stress; stress can make control much more difficult. Also be smart about alcohol, but I'm sure you heard all that already. 


(Mena) #11

I was diagnosed with Type 1 in the end of March 2003 and I began college approximately 2,000 miles from home in June. It was scary and hard, but you can do it! Be careful about monitoring your blood sugar especially during stressful times like midterms and finals. The more I am able to have a regular schedule, the better my health tends to be. Good luck!!!!


(akoster) #12

Does anyone have any advice about eating in a college cafeteria? Everything is smothered in oil and stacked with carbs . . . gross


(laxerfan) #13

I have had diabetes pretty much all my life, since November 1992 that is. I just started college across the country this year and i must say it was tough at first. After completing my first semester i was not up to par with the rest of the students. I put alot of this on the fact that my monitoring and control of my blood sugar was not where it should be. Starting the second semester i have been monitoring much more and have my blood sugar in better shape. THough the semester has just started i have noticed more of a drive to do better on my work and the quality of my work has approved. My skin has also cleared up which is a real bonus.


(Melmo) #14

I too am a freshman in college.  My school is about 3 hours from home and it has been a big adjustment (even though i have had diabetes for nine years).  The toughest thing for me has been trying to figure out how much to bolus for dining hall food.  Every meal is basically a guess and check sort of thing... ughh 

I am being obsessively diligent about recording what i am eating so i am slowly getting things figured out and i think things will improve in time....