College: living on campus


(svc428) #1

I am a sophomore in college, and i have been commuting the whole time, but next semester I am moving on campus. Basically to relieve stresses of driving back and forth (i live about 30 min. away from school), and so that being on my school's tennis team will be a lot easier as well.

But never the less I am moving on campus and am wondering about some tips as far as how much of things to bring and carry with me.

For those of you diabetics who live at school, or those who know diabetics living at school do you have any tips/advice?


(type1at18) #2

I'm also a sophomore in college and I've been living on campus the past year and a half.

What do you mean as far as bring and carry with you? Like just supplies?

As far as medical supplies I bring way more than enough. The nice part for you is that since you do live close it won't be that bad if you run low or figure out that you need some.

Are you on a pump or MDI?

As far as carrying supplies with me I only bring my pump (obviously!), meter, and glucose tablets in case I have a low.

I assume you are required to have a meal plan since you'll be living on campus? This is the hardest part for me. I end up just eating a bunch of horrible foods for me and I ended up gaining weight this semester so I'm hoping to focus more on what I eat next semester.

If you have any other specific questions feel free to ask!


(l emily l) #3

I am a freshman in college and live on campus this year, and as far as supplies, it's not that different than home. Just make sure you have everything you need plus extras and keep track of when your running low. I like to keep meters (and glucose tabs) everywhere. I have one in my backpack, purse, desk, and various other places.

Be sure to sit down with your roommate and explain diabetes and what to do if you ever had a low and needed help. If you don't have a roommate or even of you do, tell the people you are around most often and coaches.

Also, I live in a dorm and I have trouble with the mini refrigerator getting to cold and freezing things, so I keep my insulin in a small cooler in the fridge so it won't freeze.

Hope this helps!


(system) #4

I am a type one diabetic and I was stopping through Kansas City for business and stopped at a Subway Restaurant for lunch. I saw the guy taking out all of the bread out of the Sub for the guy in front of me. I asked him what he was doing and he said that they just launched a diabetic Menu. He told me that http://www.subwayscoopit.com/ has everything about this new wonderful menu for diabetics. Please tell everyone about this its seems like a very amazing opportunity for diabetics to have more choices in their diet.
Happy Holidays!


(Emma_Campbell) #5

I'm a freshman in college and a type 1 as well. I live on a small campus, so I have easy access in case I forget something... though usually I carry my meter and glucose tablets in my backpack. If I know I won't be back in my room after lunch, I take my insulin pen with me then. My advice is to at least let your RA know about the diabetes and just some short information on it. That way if something happens, the person in charge knows what's going on and what to do. I have to admit on orientation day checking my blood sugar was a great conversation starter with new people! =)


(Zemus) #6

I'm a grad student and I have always carried around syringes filled with insulin (with the amount that I would typically need following a meal). I still do that. You don't need to keep insulin cold either, that's a myth. It's ok if you do and warm is bad, but regular room temperature won't harm it.