Crazy Eating Schedules (not using pump)


(bsum) #1

So school has started back up again as did my unpredictable, never consistent schedule.  I have classes all times of the day plus work and everything else that a college kid does.  Lately my numbers have been all over the place because I don't always eat my meals at the same time (except breakfast) and when I do it's not always a full meal or I don't have time to eat everything at once.  I was wondering what everyone else has done in this situation without (or before) being on the pump.  Theoretically I know I should take a shot every time I eat something, but I don't want to be taking 10+ shots a day.  I usually try to bring low to no carb foods with me (nuts, chicken, etc) to snack on in between class but it's just hard to do that sometimes.  But anyway, what do those of you who are in college or just have crazy schedules in general do to keep your blood sugars (and hunger) in check? 

oh and a pump is not an option as of now because my insurance won't cover it all and I really can't afford one right now.

thanks!


(ndstephanie) #2

I spent three years of college without a pump, using shots.  I just took a shot every time I ate anything with carbs.  I know it's annoying to have to take like 10 shots a day, but it's better to have the quick pain and inconvience of the shots than the annoyance and danger of constant high blood sugars.


(mondaysgirl70) #3

Brian, I have a crazy schedule as well.  I take Lantus at night and Novolog on a sliding scale.  For many years before that I was on NPH, twice a day, and R Humulin insulin.  Well to improve my daytime sugars, my endo had me take a small dose of NPH in the morning.  I said to her NPH?!!!  Isn't that a step backward?  She said no, we'll add it to the Lantus and Novolog and it can provide you with a low-key coverage throughout the day.  And wouldn't you know, it worked.  Obviously dosing is indivdual but it saved me from probably 3-4 other shots and no more 275s-325's before dinner.  Good luck.


(BrianPQuinn) #4

Other Brian. I went through my whole college career on insulin. Granted I was using NPH and Humalog as well. I never really had to cover my random snacking with how I covered things. But your best option is just to stick (no pun intended) to what you are doing. As for keeping the hunger in check do you chew gum? One things I have found is that gum stimulates ones hunger and makes you crave more. Otherwise you just need to try to come up with a daily plan for each day and schedule stuff out amongst what you need to do. It sucks, but you need to do what you need to do to keep things in check. It is the only way. The pump in college can be a pain in the butt to.


(audramckell) #5

I'm not on a pump and just like you, my schedule is CRAZY! I try to make sure to get a good start to my day by eating breakfast and then just have a notebook and keep track of my carbs and shots. And I always take insulin if it has carbs. It's no fun and inconvenient, but I'd rather be healthy in the long term :)


(cdavid1) #6

I was just diagnosed last semester (my second year) of college. I forced myself to make time for eating. And although I didn't eat around the same time everyday I didn't have major BG problems but I did get very hungry a lot. One thing that I would really recommend is carrying low carb Fuze with you. It's about like 2-4 carbs per serving which isn't really enough to effect your BG much. It has enough flavor that you feel like it's helping your hunger and it may hold you off until your next meal. I know it's really hard to have something with you at all times. I wish that a pump was an option for you because I had the same problems last semester!!!


(Anonymous) #7

Restrict  your fat consumption. It comes out  of hiding  2-7 hours after eating and raises your glucose level. By doing so your glucose  levels will be more normal and you will have a better shape. Check your glucose level  three hours after eating to see how high the fat consumpion has raised your glucose.

If you plan to work out, have fats  two hours before exercising so that you will not go low.

 Eating  a moderate amount of nuts (particularly almonds or walnuts) before bed will prevent you from going low during the night.

A well controlled Type 1 should have a shape that is the envy of everyone!!


(Anonymous) #8

I forgot to mention that I carry jelly bean packets in my pocket and  in my glove compartment.  They raise my glucose level immediately because they are almost all sucrose and glucose and taste great.  I hate glucose tablets!!