Dehydration


(sophiespieg) #1

My blood sugar levels have been pretty consistently high lately (like in the 200s-300s) and I’m thinking it could be due to dehydration. I know it’s weird, but I always forget to drink water, and I think I’ve become accustomed to being dehydrated so much so that I don’t really get thirsty. Can someone please explain how dehydration could affect blood sugar levels?


(BookwormNerd13) #2

Ohhhhh yes. I’ve learned the hard way that dehydration can absolutely raise your blood sugar… When you’re dehydrated, the amount of water in your blood is less, but the amount of sugar is the same, changing the ratio between the two; that makes your blood sugar higher. The converse is also true–when your blood sugar is high, it can cause dehydration.
Moral of the story: drink lots of water! :wink:


(sophiespieg) #3

Ahhh that definitely makes sense. I better start chugging! Thank you!


(BookwormNerd13) #4

Of course! Happy to help! My mom is constantly telling me to drink more water… I’m like you, I never get thirsty. But I guess it really is important! :slight_smile:


(Dennis J. Dacey, PwD) #5

Yes Sophie @sophiespieg,
Dehydration could be a cause for your high BG readings. Our daughter who is in trauma medicine and works ER told me that most often people arriving at emergency with very high BG or in DKA happen to be dehydrated.

I have found that consistent drinking, mostly water except in summer heat and when working or exercising I add a scoop of [full sugar] Gatorade, tends to cut out peeks and lows in BG; only drawback is I can’t sleep through the night without needing to get up - so when I wake about 3 AM I check my blood.


(sophiespieg) #6

Thank you, Dennis!

The past few hours I’ve been drinking a lot of water and already feel and see a difference - my blood sugar is still around 180 but it’s definitely coming down!

I’ll definitely now have to focus on making drinking a ton of water a habit. Thanks for your advice!


(Dennis J. Dacey, PwD) #7

You are welcome Sophie, I hope it works for you.
Isn’t it a ‘nice feeling’ when your BG readings fall to within what is an acceptable range for you, and stay there much of the time.

Remember that the numbers you see on your meter, A1c or CGM display are just numbers. They give you a picture of where you are and are meaningless unless they are incorporated into our Management Thinking; I’m really happy that you recognized something and took action. An informed “Doctor Me” is our front line offence in leading a full, active and successful life - I am NOT a medical doctor.

Dennis