Diabetic retinopathy and your hb1ac changes


(Hollie) #1

Hey, I’m quite newly diagnosed and have just found out I have some background retinopathy. Do all diabetics have this? As mine does not require treatment but since ive only been type 1 for a few months it was a shock that my eyes have been affected at all when my doctors say my sugars are fine for now. Anyone else had this?
And since being diagnosed my hb1ac level has almost not lowered at all which is of course a surprise as although I was only just into the diabetic range when diagnosed I expected my BS to have been improved even though i’m only on a small amount of long acting insulin.
Just finding it all very confusing and i can’t see my nurse for a while so any input would be appreciated!
Thanks!


(joe) #2

Retinopathy, and other diabetes related complications don’t alway follow the rules. You don’t have to have diabetes to have retinopathy, kidney disease, or whatever but rather, having diabetes makes you more likely to have these complications. And diabetes can make these conditions worse.

Do your best to control sugar and exercise and you can prevent further damages. It’s always a good idea to talk about this with your endocrinologist. Good luck


(Rich) #3

Hollie, I have had type one for 41+ years, retinopathy was detected about 10 years ago. Since then I have been seeing the eye specialist (he is a diabetic eye specialist at the same clinic as my endo is located) twice per year. It is vital to keep you A1C in the 6.5 range +/- and to stay active. 10 years ago I was told that laser treatment was in my near future which was not something that I wanted at all…since then the effects of the condition have lessened and still no laser. Do as much research as you can and safely control your blood sugars, that I believe is all you can do at this point.


(Dennis J. Dacey, PWD) #4

Hollie @Hollie_99, many, many years ago I was diagnosed with retinopathy and in 1966 I volunteered, with a small group of persons with retinopathy for experimental treatment with a ruby laser. I can’t say my retinopathy was the result of “BAD” Hb A1c because that was unknown; about 10 years after my first of many laser treatments I participated in the study developing glycosylated hemoglobin report which is know known as Hb A1c.

Please keep in mind that Hb A1c is only a report card, a very good and helpful report, of what has occurred, on average during the preceding 90 days. For instance, an A1c = 6.5 would mean that during that 90 day period your BGL [Body Glucose Level] averaged 139 mg/dl. I half the time your BGL was 150 and the other half of the time your BGL was 128 you would have an average 139 or A1c of 6.5; OR, on the other hand half the time your bgl was at 39 and the other half the time it was at 24 you would also have an A1c of 6.5.
In my experience and in listening to some experts, what probably should be our goal is to work with our medical professionals and decide on goals such as an A1c of 6.5 [two endos have made that recommendation for me] and try to maintain our BG as close to that average throughout the day - it could very well be the “swings” in BG that cause otherwise weakened blood vessels in the eye to burst - one cause of retinopathy; retinopathy where we tend to grow new blood vessels on the retina is very likely caused by the excess of sugars.

Please pardon the diversion above.


(Hollie) #5

That seems pretty good going though considering you’ve been diabetic for so long! I’m only 22 and still in my honeymoon period so feels far too early for this yet! Thanks!


(Hollie) #6

Yes that’s very true about your hb1ac, as i’m in my honeymoon period I feel it’s useful to keep tabs on how that’s going as my endocrinologist I see every 6 months and just says until i’m having problems don’t worry about it! But my hb1ac is 48 which considering I don’t have any lows since i’m hardly on any insulin I see no reason to why I can’t strive to stay around 5-6 rather than 7-8!


(Dennis J. Dacey, PWD) #7

Hollie,
Being a “newbie” with diabetes I’d like to offer bits and pieces that may help you live a long, full and active lHollie,
Being a “newbie” with diabetes I’d like to offer bits and pieces that may help you live a long, full and active life - I like your attitude.
This may sound somewhat back-end-to to you right now but I suggest that you concentrate on living life and reaching or surpassing goals and learn to manage YOUR diabetes to permit you to do so - always think positive.ife - I like your attitude.
This may sound somewhat back-end-to to you right now but I suggest that you concentrate on living life and reaching or surpassing goals and learn to manage YOUR diabetes to permit you to do so - always think positive.
You now have many tools at hand, and some wonderful new stuff is in development, to assist you with diabetes management - with advice of your medical team select what is best for you and move forward. As you learn more and more of the basics you will find that you are your primary diabetes care physician - no one else knows exactly what you are feeling or experiencing. But always keep close a knowledgeable health professional with whom you are very comfortable sharing.


(bsteingard) #8

Hi, Hollie_99. Joe’s right about diabetes not following the rules. I’ve had diabetes for 24 years with an A1c below 7.5 for most, if not all, of that time and I first developed retinopathy at the 19-year mark, when my A1c was routinely under 7. My doctor also said it was nothing to worry about and the following year she said she couldn’t see any sign of it. But the year after that it had come back. Since then I’ve continued to see my opthalmologist annually and she continues to tell me it’s nothing to worry about yet. If your doctors are not concerned, then I wouldn’t spend a lot of time worrying about it. Just do your best to learn how your body works and keep getting your eyes checked regularly. Also, if the retinopathy does get worse, remember it doesn’t necessarily mean you didn’t take care of yourself or that you did a bad job.


(DDrumminMan) #9

You say newly diagonised. Not sure how newly that is. But after I was diagnosed and got on insulin and was feeling like a person again,my eyesight got really bad for a month or so. It was really bad. I had to buy a magnifying glass to read. The doctors said it would go away. Had something to do with my body adjusting to insulin or something.

Anyway, it went away after a month or so. Maybe this is what you’re experiencing?