Does This Sound Like a Potential Cure?


(DiabetesNewsHound) #1

We ran an article about this soldier that has his pancrease shot and doctors had to remove it, causing him to become diabetic. They then removed insulin-producing cells and transplanted them into the liver. Check it out here: Doctors ‘Cure’ Wounded Soldier’s Diabetes With Experimental Surgery

I know there are a lot of developments that can lead to false hope for a cure. What do you think of this development?

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(eva330) #2

#1 why is it being called "Severe Diabetes" is that what you are referring to T1 as? not clear on this.

#2 Th last part of the srticle states: "Researchers, in very limited experimental surgeries, have taken cells from cadaver donors, or even pigs in some cases, and transplanted them into humans suffering from severe forms of diabetes. However, the patients in those cases must receive a swath of drugs to prevent the body from rejecting and destroying the new cells."

doesnt sound so good


(DDrumminMan) #3

[quote user="Evamarie"]

#2 Th last part of the srticle states: "Researchers, in very limited experimental surgeries, have taken cells from cadaver donors, or even pigs in some cases, and transplanted them into humans suffering from severe forms of diabetes. However, the patients in those cases must receive a swath of drugs to prevent the body from rejecting and destroying the new cells."

doesnt sound so good

[/quote]

That was my thought.  Having your pancreas shot and removed is similar to T1 but not the same.  His body never attacked his TCells.  If you put that stuff in your liver, you still have to prevent your body from attacking the new TCells.  At least that's how I understand it.  So therefore, it wouldn't be a cure.  If I have to take anti rejection drugs in order to be "cured", then I'm not interested.


(DDrumminMan) #4

[quote user="Evamarie"]

#1 why is it being called "Severe Diabetes" is that what you are referring to T1 as? not clear on this.

[/quote]

Can't speak for DiabetesNewHound, but I think they're referring to people who have horrible control no matter what they do.  Not all diabetics are created equally.  Some are able to control very well with hard work.  Others, no matter how hard they work at it, their body doesn't co operate.  I think the second group is what they're referring to with the work "severe".


(KathyW) #5

This soldier was lucky that this option is available.  It is not easy to live without any pancreas.  This procedure allowed him to at least have use of his islet cells.  He will have to take immunosuppressant drugs, but they are not nearly as bad as living without islet cells.  Having severe Type 1 diabetes is similar to this situation and in my opinion, having an islet cell transplant with donor cells is a gift of a new life.  I had this procedure 17 months ago and have felt grateful for every day since.  Life is easier and unquestionably better.  I understand the risks of the immunosuppressants, and still believe that I have made the right choice to have had this done.


(DiabetesNewsHound) #6

The article was a summary of an account in the Miami Herald. When writing the piece I didn’t give much thought to defining ‘severe’ and just assumed that this would widely be understood as what is commonly referred to “brittle diabetes.” Most people elligible for the islet transplants have very poor control due to the severity of their diabetes. We all know diabetes comes in many shapes and sizes and impacts each person in a slightly different way. So, the short answer is the Herald didn’t define severe and I just assumed it to be the conventional definition, although its not entirely clear how this relates to the soldier since his situation is quite unique