First A1C :-(


(JillinCalgary) #1

My daughter was diagnosed with type 1 January 25th of this year.  This past week her blood was drawn for our first ever A1C count.  Our much anticipated clinic visit was this morning and we were devastated to hear she stood at 9.8% (around an average of 15 bg).  What a blow!! We thought we were doing so well!  It's a sad day around here... :-(

Hopefully next time we'll see an improvement.

I'm wondering how long it will take to see a marked improvement in her levels.  Anyone have any personal experience or insight they'd like to share?

 


(Anonymous) #2

Jillin,

Keep in mind that your daughter was just recentley diagnosed, so even if your care has been very careful and well-handled it takes time to show in numbers. This is the first three months she has insulin for her body, so you can't expect to see a perfect A1c when she's been going without this hormone for so long. I hope this makes sense :D

But rather than it being a sad day, celebrate your success. No matter what number it was this time, it's most likely at its best. Be proud of you and your daughter - diabetes isn't easy, and at least you're headed in the right direction. You have to encounter the higher numbers in order to get to the lower- its like a ladder.

Hang in there, my friend. That A1c is an accomplishment.

- Alyssa


(stilledlife) #3

Don't let the numbers be a score card. The numbers tell what the body needs, it is a code to be translated and figured out. It is okay to be sad about diabetes, but not about numbers.

Also, you will see improvemnet! Keep in mind that her little body is doing lots of things, like growing, learning, exploring, being diabetic. It will just take time.


(system) #4

[quote user="stilledlife"]

Don't let the numbers be a score card. The numbers tell what the body needs, it is a code to be translated and figured out. It is okay to be sad about diabetes, but not about numbers.

Also, you will see improvemnet! Keep in mind that her little body is doing lots of things, like growing, learning, exploring, being diabetic. It will just take time.

[/quote]

 

Well said, stilledlife.


(JillinCalgary) #5

Thanks for your kind words.  We are definitely still in the "learning to cope" stage.  I'm very proud of my daughter and our efforst as a family.  You are absolutely right, there is no way to go but up from here.  We'll figure it out.. eventually. 


(LauraJ) #6

Hi, I was diagnosed in March and I had my first A1C at the end of may and I was 9.8 also.  I knew it wasnt a great number but I put it into perspective because my A1C at diagnosis was 14.  I looked at the improvement I had made in such a short period of time.  You obviously care very much and are working very hard and that is what really matters! Good luck!

Laura


(ktbabyx33) #7

Ive had diabetes for five years and my A1C STILL isnt where me, my doctors, and my family want it to be. it may take a while for your daughter's A1C to go down because through out your whole journey, you may have to change how much insulin she takes and everything like that. So until the body gets used to the right insulin amount, you may not see the results you'd like to. When i was diagnosed my A1C was about 14.7 and finally its down to around 8. still not where they'd like it, but its getting there and its alot better. [:

 

- Katelyn


(ktbabyx33) #8

Ive had diabetes for five years and my A1C STILL isnt where me, my doctors, and my family want it to be. it may take a while for your daughter's A1C to go down because through out your whole journey, you may have to change how much insulin she takes and everything like that. So until the body gets used to the right insulin amount, you may not see the results you'd like to. When i was diagnosed my A1C was about 14.7 and finally its down to around 8. still not where they'd like it, but its getting there and its alot better. [:

 

- Katelyn


(sarahslp) #9

How old is your daughter? When I was middle school age, all the hormonal fluxuations (sp?) of puberty made it extra difficult to keep my sugars in range. It was just an annoying phase. But in high school, my A1c were back in the 6's or 7's (don't remember).

This may have nothing to do w/ your daughter depending on her age, but just my 2 cents. (:

Good luck! The first year is tough from what my parents have told me. You'll get through it!


(SunshineStateAdvocate) #10

First of all, if your daughter is young, and newly diagnosed at that, you can't hold her to the same standards, or ever really compare her to older T1Ds or people who have had the disease for a number of years already. The A1C range for a normal, healthy, non-diabetic individual, as you may know, is 4-6% with a blood glucose target of ~80-120. But, A1Cs a bit over 6 are typically accepted for young patients with T1D because for them to be within the aforementioned reference range would probably mean they are having many hypoglycemic events, so, in a few words, it is generally safer for a kid to have an A1C of 6.5, 7, 7.5, 8, at least while they are kids (for example, their target blood glucose range may be 90-180). But, your concern is understandable, 9.8% is a bit high, but still not bad considering the recent onset, and it's great you want to do better next time. You can see a marked improvement within a few months, at her next doctor's visit. I don't know how her diabetes is being managed now, but, you (or her) or both of you as a team, need to count the carbs for each and every food/drink she has (as time consuming as it is, it really is worth it) and do insulin accordingly, and make adjustments (with your doctors permission) to her insulin:carb ratio if she's ending up too high or too low after meals. Also, if you're not already doing it, she needs to check her blood sugar 2 hours after meals (this will also help her identify if there is a problem with her I:C ratio). Also, at some point you may want to consider having her use a continuous glucose monitor. While the devices are not totally accurate, they are helpful in revealing trends. Also, if she's not on an insulin pump, consider that. I hope this is helpful


(cdavid1) #11

It all depends on what the A1C was at diagnosis, and since this is her first A1C you probably wouldn't know what her numbers were. When I was diagnosed my A1C was only 9.7 and a few months later it was 7. You have to look at it in terms of where she started.


(rachmerc) #12

To echo what everyone else said--don't beat yourself up over this!  9.8% is not too shabby especially when your daughter has just been diagnosed!  Keep doing what you're doing and it will go down! 

I've been diabetic for 8 years and my A1c started off great at around 6.3%, but now I'm hovering around 8%, and I'm trying so hard to get it back down.  It's not easy!  All you can do is do the best you can! 

Hang in there!

Rachel


(msf02) #13

Stilledlife,  Brilliant and empowering.  I have texted your comment to my daughter.  She will see it when she wakes up.  She is so condemned when her sugars are high and I would rather she saw them as her friendly tool to give direction.  She will get there.
But thanks again for great words.

michelle


(Gina) #14

Jillin,

I am late to this post.

Don't get yourself all worked up about the numbers. I have been there and it only makes you more crazed! Highs happen. YOu are still new to all of this and you are totally doing a great job! Please don't beat yourself up.

You can see results in your next a1c test it really is that quick. I went from 8.2 to 7.3 in 3 months.