Had to switch to vials/syringes


(sneathbupp) #1

Hi all, my insurance only covers insulin in vials instead of pens. I don’t mind it, but I have a question about active outdoor activities. I’m nervous about carrying the vials up and down rocky trails, in kayaks etc. I was thinking of prefilling syringes with insulin. However, I like to carry some long acting in case I get stuck overnight. Any tips on labelling Humolog vs Lantus syringes. Actually, any tips on outdoor use would be appreciated. Thanks


(Nicolee) #2

I have to say I admire how well you are taking your insurance doing that to you, I was totally not okay when my insurance stopped covering my pens for a reasonable amount. From my experience with outdoor activities and syringes I learned a few things.

  • if you pack the syringes prefilled, make sure they are in a hard case and that the end wont be pushed down, shooting all your insulin into your cap. That’s always a bummer.
  • Good call bringing a backup lantus, you just never know. I used to use a small piece of duct tape around the end of the syringe cap if i needed to differentiate between humolog and lantus. I’m sure washi tape, regular tape or a sharpie would work just as well.
  • Temperature controlling cases are worth the money. They have ones that will keep your insulin cool if you’ll be in hot temps. I’m pretty sure they even make ones that have hard cases for protection and little wells for your syringes and viles to sit in securely so you wouldn’t have to prefill anything.
  • Check your Rx info to make sure you know what temps the insulin you use can handle. I had mine freeze on me once while I was skiing. I figured my body heat would be enough but clearly I was very wrong lol
  • If you’re going out on the water it can never hurt to put everything in a watertight bag, like a ziploc or something.

Hopefully this is all helpful to you and you can get back to normal outdoor fun without the stress soon. I always get nervous about outdoor activities too but I guess the silver lining is that it motivates us to prepare for anything.


(sneathbupp) #3

Thanks! All helpful. Otherwise


(sneathbupp) #4

Otherwise I don’t mind. The needles on the brand of syringes are more comfortable than the pen needles.


(wadawabbit) #5

Amazon has a selection of diabetes travel kits that might work for Your exciting plans. They also have padded carriers that use when I open by bottles. Have fun!!


(Chris) #6

Hey there. I’m an outdoors photographer (long distance hiking, kayaking, biking, climbing, etc.) with T1D. I’m 43 and was diagnosed when I was 3. Before I switched to the pens, I would fill a few syringes up to the max amount with different insulins (Humalog/Regular & NPH). I would then administer when needed. I knew when I was out, I had enough to get me by. The pens are so much better though. I’m on Levemir and Novalog now.

On another note, I carry a ton of peanut M&M’s for low blood sugar. They don’t melt!


(bsteingard) #7

I’ve always kept my diabetes supplies (meter, insulin, syringes, you name it) in their own little case inside whatever bag I happen to be carrying that day. I’ve always used a fanny pack or similar type of bag. But there are bags out there designed specifically for carrying diabetes supplies (like Myabetic and Sugar Medical). That keeps stuff from getting jostled much. And when I’ve needed to keep my insulin cool I’ve used Frio packs. They just need to soak in water to recharge and the cooling gel is squishy and would probably protect the vials from most bumps or falls. Bubble wrap would also help protect the vials. Maybe the syringes, too, if you wrap them right.

Also, I second the tip about peanut M&M’s! And Ziploc bags for kayaking.


(sneathbupp) #8

Thanks for the suggestions