High Elevation and blood sugars


(Gina) #1

While in Lake Tahoe I experienced very high blood sugar levels, I spent two days there and it was so difficult to get my blood sugar below 250. Other things I was going through were nose bleeds, fatigue and difficulty breathing. 

When I was there I started tweeting about my symptoms and someone I know told me that they bring their type 1 son to Lake Tahoe every year and he can't control his sons blood sugars there either. He said it is because of the higher altitude. He also told me I was probably having altitude sickness which I then looked up on the internet and that calmed me down because honestly I have never had a nose bleed in my life till I went to Tahoe and thought I was having a heart attack or something.

I had no idea that elevation could do these types of things to a person! Who knew! Has anyone else gone to a higher altitude and experienced this type of thing? 


(HD-Guy) #2

Hi Gina,

I don't remember having any problems in the past with high elevation. Did you drive there or fly, if you flew maybe the plane trip was part of it. I have heard of people getting nose bleeds while at higher elevations but I've never had a problem with that. I would guess that the fatigue was not helped by your higher blood sugars.

HD-Guy


(PhillK) #3

Highs in High elevation you say?

Hmm, my experience so far has been lows.  The only two times that I have ever required assistance because of having a low BG was when I was in high altitude areas.


(Kimmarie) #4

I also experience higher blood sugars at higher elevations. I climb 14,000 foot mountains and 99% of the time have some diabetic issue during my treckking. Make sure you are really hydrated before you go back. In the weeks prior to arrival, drink a lot of water--plain water--and that will help you adjust.

 


(smat1234) #5

[quote user="Kimmarie"]

I also experience higher blood sugars at higher elevations. I climb 14,000 foot mountains and 99% of the time have some diabetic issue during my treckking. Make sure you are really hydrated before you go back. In the weeks prior to arrival, drink a lot of water--plain water--and that will help you adjust.

 

[/quote]

I'm the same way.  I can hike 20 miles in one day and my blood sugars are high.  I've always thought higher altitudes played a part in it.  In addition to drinking lots of water before you go skip anything with caffeine.   

 


(Kateski) #6

YES YES YES!  When I go snow skiing in Colorado, It is next to impossible to keep my BG out of the 200's.   I always thought that the altitude had something to do with it, but never really knew...


(sarahslp) #7

A friend of mine w/ T1 told me once that she gets terrible highs every time she gets sent somewhere that's a high elevation for work. I guess if you lived there, your body would adjust... Hope you're feeling better soon!