Homeschooling?


(Joselyn) #1

My daughter started elementary last year, and boy what a year. She got sick alot and missed alot of days. Fast forward this year and she’s been getting sick alot as well which of course it affects her diabetes. Consequently, she’s behind on her academics and this really concerns me. She tries her very best but I know my daughter isn’t getting full attention when there’s over 20’something students to teach. My question to parents is… are you homeschooling? Is it way better than public school ? Has this work for you and your child better ?


(joe) #2

@Jolly hi Joselyn, My son does not have diabetes… I do, and it is so very common to be exposed to many different things when in school. My son did get sick, quite often when he started, but it has been my opinion that being exposed to social situations is difficult to teach at home, and that complete shelter from exposure is impossible. It is for these reasons that we stayed the course. Yes, sick days for me made diabetes a little more “interesting” but I survived. I hope your daughter has the proper accommodations at school, including a detailed IHCP as part of a 504 plan.

good luck.

PS I Might add that when I was in grammar school there was no such thing as a 504 plan or homeschooling, but I was almost 13 and could advocate for myself anyway. The experience of school helped me, even though it was tough.


(Amanda ) #3

Like Joe @joe said, a 504 plan is great to have. I am not a parent (13) but I know what your daughter is going through. I was in the hospital for a week this past February for a week and it was hard to catch up. My 504 helps when I need to go to the nurse or have snacks as well as when I’m gone for T1 related things. Homeschooling doesn’t help children and teens with social situations. If you homeschool her all through her schooling career, she’s going to miss a ton of things including school dances and prom. She’ll also have a harder chance at making friends and may even not like being around other people since she didn’t get that at a younger age. A family friend homeschools her kids and when her daughter (14) is helping her at her resurant, she doesn’t like waiting tables because she’s not used to being around other people. Hope this helps.


(Joselyn) #4

I was actually just thinking of doing it for a year. She does have a 504.


(Amanda ) #5

Oh. OK. That helps. You can even talk to her teachers when she’s sick and get her homework so you can help her with it. That ways she’s not falling behind.


(Danni) #6

I have two kids, both now teenagers, both doing an online school at the moment. One is a T1D and one is not. Through their academic careers so far they have done traditional homeschool, online school and brick and mortar school. Like you, my T1D was always getting sick at the beginning of brick and mortar school. No, I can not protect him from every germ in the universe but I can get him out of a classroom where kids/teens aren’t as “sanitary” as they should be. He rarely gets sick now. I have to politely disagree about the social aspect every one keeps bringing up. Homeschooling has been around for a very long time and you would be hard pressed not to be able to find some sort of homeschooling resource near you. There are groups of kids/parents all over the country that get together and either form co-ops or just regular play groups. The great thing about the groups is that they are not all the same age. Kids are exposed to all ages and not just peers. If you think about it, that is a very real benefit because, besides a school environment, where else are you stuck with people all your same age? My boys are well adjusted and outspoken and have opinions they love to share. Homeschooling does not mean you will bring up a hermit that never wants to leave the house or know how to interact with others. Many kids thrive in a homeschool environment and wouldn’t do it any other way. But it is also hard work. You have to be prepared to actually teach her and face the challenges that being a Mom and a teacher bring. But if you are up for the challenge it is more rewarding than I can even begin to tell you.


(Joselyn) #7

@dannien thank you so much. I wanted to hear from a parent that has a T1D. I noticed that people kept bringing up about the social aspect. I’m more concerned about my daughter’s academics. She’s barely in 1st grade. She’s super out going so there’s other things she can do like play grounds or ballet to get that social life lol. But that’s not the problem. The problem is her academics. And you’re right I can’t protect her from every germ out there but the school already told me that they are doing as much as they can already… and to me is not to my “expectation” enough. I spoke to a representative from K12 and it sounded like a great option for my daughter , I mean I can imagine it’s hard work but being a mom who has a T1D kid is hard and yet we still do it :slight_smile: . Thank you again for commenting .


(Maria) #8

I have a 10 year old son with T1D who was diagnosed only two months ago. He spent 3 years in public school before we decided to homeschool for several reasons (before he was diagnosed). It IS hard work, but where we live there is an amazing community of people for support and we’re part of a great co-op where my son has taken classes in everything from bicycle repair to French. He says if he has his way, he’d never go back to traditional school. I’ve found that wherever I feel like my own skills as a teacher are lacking, I have always been able to find a resource, whether online or nearby, that has his needs covered. And I can definitely say it has been a fairly easy (as easy as it can be!) transition into our “new normal” since I have peace of mind knowing that I am either around or in close contact with the coaches, instructors, etc, who also teach him. I know of at least one family who has tried the k12 route. Their feedback was that it is easy because the curriculum is all laid out, but not very flexible and they felt tethered to their lap-tops. Of course this is just one family’s experience. Homeschoolers are as unique as t1d kids, like snowflakes. If you decide to go for it, you’ll find your own way. Good luck!


(carolynwoodham) #9

Where do you live? I know an amazing school in Lilburn and Johns Creek!


(Joselyn) #10

I live in Norcross area. What’s the names of each ?


(Joselyn) #11

Thank you so much for your comments. I really do appreciate it.