How did your parents change your life?


(zack mom) #1

I am a mother of a 6 year-old amazing Boy! Everyday I am just in aww of him and his strength! I have am scared and need to know how much does a mother make a differnce in a diabetic's life. I hate say no to food because it not good for his body! My heart breaks every time he crys because he doesn't want another shot. And I really don't want to here people who don't know about type 1 diabetes tell that they know everything about Zach. Sometimes it hard and I just want to know How your parent change your life.


(system) #2

The first thing they told my mom when I was diagnosed at the age of 6, was to NOT start saying "no" to everything. They told her to still let me have the occasional oero cookie, ice cream, etc and to balance it. They wanted me to live as close to a normal life as I had before, instead of drastically changing it. They also told her that being diagnosed at such a young age was probably the best time it could have happened, as I wouldn't remember over time what it was like without it and I would have an eariler time dealing with it as I grew up. My mom was talking about it last night to my future sister-in-laws' mother(my bros gf has life threatening allergies) and she says it was the best piece of advice she was given when first starting out. After seeing other parents being told differently throughout the years and the harsh effect it had/still has on their children, she's glad they didn't try to enforce a stricit diet rule.

Everything was given in moderation, and she did more often than not tell me "no you can't have that" because I was too high and we were waiting for my levels to go down, or I had already had a treat that day...but even at that age I grew to understand that no, I wouldn't get to have this or that whenever I wanted but that I might get to eat an oero with my snack if I'm really good, do excatly what mom tells me to do and don't fight against having a needle. It allowed me to not feel different from my brother and my friends, and I have to say it really helped me avoid the depression a lot of diabetic go through. I've never felt depressed because of my diabetes, I know I have it, I deal with it and I know if I want to have a treat or something really sugary that there are certain times it's not okay and other times that I just need to take a bit more insulin.

It's hard on a parent no matter what when your kid is diagnosed. My mom always tears up when she talks about having to give me shots as a kid and still feels horrible about it..I don't think parents ever get over that, but as long as you do your best your kid will appreciate everything you do for them. I'm not one to cry but when I think about the stress my mom went through(and still goes through) and the guilt she has over my diagnoses even though she knows it wasn't something she did..I can't help but tear up myself! If it weren't for her, I wouldn't be here and her keeping me as normal as she could was the best thing I could've asked for! what doesn't kill you only makes you a stronger, better person!

 


(Juvenile1knoxville) #3

[quote user="zack mom"]

I am a mother of a 6 year-old amazing Boy! Everyday I am just in aww of him and his strength! I have am scared and need to know how much does a mother make a differnce in a diabetic's life. I hate say no to food because it not good for his body! My heart breaks every time he crys because he doesn't want another shot. And I really don't want to here people who don't know about type 1 diabetes tell that they know everything about Zach. Sometimes it hard and I just want to know How your parent change your life.

[/quote]

Mother of Zach...I was diagnosed with Type I at 16.  My parents did not have to give me shots, I did myself.  That was not easy for me, but I did what I had to do.  As a parent, you know the importance of insulin, do not feel guilty about giving your child the shots.  I have three children, thank goodness none have diabetes, I do have one that just had a seizure and must take medicine daily to prevent any more.  He hates the medicine, but I can not give in.  Stay firm and explain that he must have it in order to live, but stay calm and do not cry in front of him.  The best thing my parents ever did when I was diagnosed was act like it was no big deal.  They never got upset in front of me.  My sister told me years later, after my Mom died that she cried when I was diagnosed.  I was surprised, but glad that she stayed calm around me.  It was the best thing for me, I accepted diabetes from day one.


(zack mom) #4

Thank you! I do give him everything that other have and your right it is in moderation! But you know when you go to birthday party and there is a bowl of M&M and do have to say NO. Though are the times I was refering to. Your last paragraph is amazing and it what I was hoping to hear someday from Zach. Thank you and thank your mom from raiseing someone that is able to talk about it.


(Anonymous) #5

My parents, in a word, are simply and undeniably amazing.

I think if I tried to work it all out in a post for Juvenation, I’d crash their servers. Too much text, not enough bandwidth.
J


(stilledlife) #6

My mom. The most wonderful teacher in my life.
I was diagnosed 3 days before my 12th birthday (I saw my diagnosing doctor a few months ago and she was convinced that I was 7 because I was so small and put up such a fit) I was angry, my sugar was high- 711.
I had to get my blood drawn; I kicked the nurse and cried. My mom sat on me. When I asked if it was going to hurt, she told me yes, but that did not matter, I have to have my blood drawn any way.
I remember her sadness and stern look that told me to be brave.
I learned the reality of what was happening to me through her calm accepting demeanor.
I know that she cried, but she never showed it to me.
Everything my mom did, she watched my diet- she never told me “no”… she was sneaky she would ask me “are you sure you need that?”
I can’t say enough for what she did.
Well... I've graduated from college and have never been to the hospital for my diabetes. >_> I blame her. =)


(Master_Jason) #7

My parents are very important to me, they worked hard so that I could have a happy childhood. My parents never had a lot of money but that is not the most important thing for a family. They were always there and helped me as much as they could. However, I got a lot of financial support and I hope I can give them something back one day.


(Anonymous) #8

To be more specific this time:

The weekend before my parents sprung the doctor appointment on me we went on a road trip as our last “hurrah” before we put a name to what was wrong. Spending nearly a week in the Hospital, my family stood with me the entire time. Near the end of the stay I requested that Dad bring in a change of clothes, given that I had been wearing the same shirt for a week. A baseball cap made the list of what I asked for.Dad brought the cap he’d purchased on our road trip. My relatives had always written quotes in their own hats. When he brought the hat in he explained just how much he wanted me to have it; on the underside of the bill was written: ‘Stay Brave,’ signed Dad, October 2005. I wore that cap proudly and gratefully when I was discharged, and continue to today. The words were positioned just right; when the days get hard, as I acknowledge they will, I wear that baseball cap. And when it feels like I have lost myself, or I cannot seem to find the strength to stand once more, I look up, and I can see the words loud and clear.

 

I strongly believe that the care I take in diabetes and the person I am today has everything to do with my family; I believe they are everything that helps me “stay strong.”


(meme) #9

What a mom,one that I would look to for guidance in the type1 world. I would let her read what you wrote about about her. It is words any mom would want to hear. we  moms try.


(coryd) #10

We have an amazing  4 year old (diagnosed @ 16 months of age).  If his BG is good we will let him have snacks, although we limit typical sweets (oreos, etc) to maybe 4 peices tops and usually only two - when we even choose those.  Typically we encourage snacks with a better glycemic index (or whatever you want to call it).  We have found that the Quaker oatmeal bars are very kind on his glucose levels.  Even at 46g of carbs, they have a lot of whole oats and it doesn't seem to raise his blood sugar much.  My wife did a test one day and let him eat 4 of them over the course of the day, checking his BG every hour.  I don't think it ever got above 160.  our little guys has a 7 year old brother and 2 year old sister.  His compliance is really amazing.  He understands that he must wait for sancks if his "sugar" is too high.  Makes you want to cry when you see how calmly he accepts things.

As for the parties, it's just tough.  We will bring snacks with us as a backup (cause you never know what they are serving).  Seems like every cake has a ton of icing.  We will usually scrape off most of the icing and bring a diet drink or a drink with low carbs to avoid the nightmare of the fully loaded soda...  They never serve in cans so there is now way to measure any drink anyway.  It's terrible.  Make sure you watch their plate, cause there are always the parent or attendant who wants to be the "quicker picker upper" and they will throw away the cake plate before you get a chance to see how much the kid ate.  I always hate that one...

We have spent our entire time with Diabetes (and as a parent, you pretty much have the disease too - you are your child's new pancreas) and it is practically impossible to get the average stranger to "get" that you need to count/estimate all the carbohydrates your child consumes...  It's a daily struggle.  You are not alone.  My wife and I regularly pray for all other parents of young children with Type I.

Stay strong!