How Do I Convince My Mom a Pump is Different?


(hcole) #1

I have been thinking about getting an insulin pump for a few months, and have just started looking into them seriously.  The problem is that my mom doesn't think that I need one.  It doesn't seem to matter what I say to her she just doesn't seem to understand how a pump would make a difference.  She figures there is no difference between the pump and injections. 

I am 21, so I can make my own decisions, the only problem is that I am a student, so I am still under my parents health insurance.  The insurance company doesn't want to cover a pump because my current A1c's are really good, and they will only cover the pump if my current method is not working.  I could probably get  them to with a little fighting, but I need my parents help to do so.

Any suggestions on how to convince her that pumping is different from MDI?  Any stories about how being on a pump has changed things for you?  I have really good blood sugar control, so that isn't really an issue....  I would just like the freedom so that I can adjust to a busy work day and I exercise a lot. 

Thanks for your help in advance... 


(system) #2

why not get your endo to talk to her about it? or sign up for one of those pump information sessions?


(hcole) #3

Unfortunately I don't have an endo:(, I have to get referred to one and they will only refer me to one if I have serious complications or am an unusual case.  I took her to an appointment with a nurse at the education centre here, and all she got out of it was it's a different way to administer insulin, you have a way to administer insulin, therefore an expensive machine to do it for you is not necessary..  She refuses to go to the sessions put on by the pump companies because she thinks by talking to a salesperson I am getting a one sided view because they just want me to buy their pump.


(system) #4

ha sounds like me!

hmm well that's lame. i don't know if that's the same case with endo's in BC..but i remember the first three years we had to go see my family doctor to get a referrel to see my endo..they finally just automatically send them now or something...

sorry those were all i could think of that might help. it's pretty much what my mom did when my endo suggested i look into it and she was kind of in favour of at least exploring it.


(hcole) #5

Both good ideas!  She is just really stubborn....

I think I need to ask the reps about maybe trial periods.  If she knows we can get rid of it after 30 days without paying for it maybe she will just think why not?

Do you have a pump?


(kbuckleync) #6

My A1C's are really great too, always under 5.9, but I was able to get a pump covered by my health insurance (Aetna).  Most health insurance companies are coming around and realizing that it's a good thing to cover.  

I contacted the pump comany (OmniPod) that I wanted to get a pump from and they dealt directly with my insurance company to get it covered.  You should try the same thing.  Do some research on the different pumps available, then once you decide on one, contact their insurance customer support person and give them your insurance information.  Your mom doesn't even need to be involved.  Unless of course there will be a copayment due.  Luckily mine was covered at 100%, and maybe yours will be too.  it's definitely worth checking out.

And tell your mom that this is a great way to keep your blood sugars more even...for times like at night when you're sleeping.  My blood sugar always rose in the middle of the night so I was able to program my pump to deal with surges like that!

Good luck!


(system) #7

[quote user="Heather Cole"]

Both good ideas!  She is just really stubborn....

I think I need to ask the reps about maybe trial periods.  If she knows we can get rid of it after 30 days without paying for it maybe she will just think why not?

Do you have a pump?

[/quote]

understandable, my mom was interested but the cost was a huge factor for her since pharmacare wouldn't cost the cost. I think my work insurance would cover it, but I'm not interested in the pump. I prefer the "old fashion" way of syringes. :)

 

I'm sure there's some kind of trial out there for one of them..makes sense cuz it's more likely to help them sell that pump to you!


(Marldance) #8

I know you said you already brought your mom to talk to a nurse but maybe try bringing her to someone again but tell that person in advance that you really want to win your mom over to getting you a pump. They may try to be a little more persuasive. Sorry you are having such a hard time with all of this as well as with your insurance. I kind of get the pump thing but an endo is such a basic thing to have! Maybe you could try to get get some sort of medical professional to help you with the insurance company. They probably have experience with this and may know what to say to the company to get them to cover things such as doctors visits and medical supplies such as a pump. Good luck!


(Sugar-FreeInYYC) #9

Hello,

I am currently researching pump therapy aswell.  Most pump companies have a trial (refund policy) period in which you can use the pump and then return it with no questions asked if you don't like it or decide it's too pricy.  I would still recommend you check with the companies for that though.


Most companies are really easy to set up meetings with - I know cause I have a meeting with the Accu-Chek rep and Animas and Medtronic next week.  To be honest, of course they will try to sell their product... it's their job, but (as an example) the Animas and Medtronic reps are T1 diabetics on pumps too.  And they were on a pump before working for the company, or so they say.  If they talked to your mom, maybe she would come around... OR maybe still not. 

If I were you I would push to get an endocrinologist though, they are vital and they need to sign off on the prescription for it regardless (unless your fam. doctor would be about to).


I hope this helps, good luck in your research!

Andrée


(joe) #10

Heather, buy the book Pumping Insulin by John Walsh and Ruth Roberts.  It's like ~11 bucks at amazon.  It explains why a pump is different, and BTW it's different for a lot of reasons.

I don't know how long you've had T1 or if you still honeymoon.  The basic problem with long acting insulin is that it absorbs at a constant rate throughout the day, while your body's daily insulin requirements vary widely.  That variance means you have to correct a lot during the day, either by injecting short acting to bring down a high, or by eating to bring up a low. 

Plus is you have a highly variable schedule, or a wide variety inyour daily activity leves, it is very hard to match your daily requirements witha single shot you took up to 20 hours ago.

You can match your daily requirements with a pump.  You can program it to deliver your requirement, when you need it. you progream profiles for active days sick days and couch potato days.  If you want ot do vigouous activity you just turn down your basal, you CAN NOT do that on lantus or other long acting insulins.   

The pumps biggest issue is cost, the machine is one thing but the infusion sets (consumables) are also very expensive. 

good luck.


(sstrumello) #11

Consider inviting a pump salesperson over to the house to speak with both you and your mother.  They have a LOT of experience in addressing all of these questions, and in most cases, with do a lot of the work with the insurance companies, etc.  It could be the type of information your mother needs to get a better understanding of just how much easier a pump can potentially make life for you!  BTW, as a former pump wearer myself (I am one of the few to return to MDI), there is something to be said for the experience of wearing a pump even if it isn't permanent  that only wearing a pump can teach you ... while you're HbA1c is unlikely to improve much (the clinical literature shows that the biggest improvements come from those whose control isn't great to begin with)!

 

[quote user="Heather Cole"]

I have been thinking about getting an insulin pump for a few months, and have just started looking into them seriously.  The problem is that my mom doesn't think that I need one.  It doesn't seem to matter what I say to her she just doesn't seem to understand how a pump would make a difference.  She figures there is no difference between the pump and injections. 

I am 21, so I can make my own decisions, the only problem is that I am a student, so I am still under my parents health insurance.  The insurance company doesn't want to cover a pump because my current A1c's are really good, and they will only cover the pump if my current method is not working.  I could probably get  them to with a little fighting, but I need my parents help to do so.

Any suggestions on how to convince her that pumping is different from MDI?  Any stories about how being on a pump has changed things for you?  I have really good blood sugar control, so that isn't really an issue....  I would just like the freedom so that I can adjust to a busy work day and I exercise a lot. 

Thanks for your help in advance... 

[/quote]

 


(Eric_Carpenter) #12

Even if you can't do a month trial, I went through a diabetes ed. course and had to wear a pump for 48 hours with saline to give me the "feel". If your parents are uncomfortable because they feel you couldn't handle the pump this may help. I use the pump most of the time, and compared to MDI it is wonderful. The few days I do not use the pump I am sluggish, unmotivated, and cranky. People have commented on how different my mood is on the pump or on MDI.  I have a Minimed, and the company is extremely pleasant to work with. Tech support is available 24 hours a day, and they have overnighted parts to me at no cost (once I got a recalled batch of supplies, another time my battery cap was not working).  Researchers are working on "telehealth" applications, so you may soon be able to control pumps with your cell phone. Already on the market is the MaxLink blood glucometer, which can communicate with the Minimed Paradigm.


(FitnessBabe) #13

I have been a diabetic for 32 years now, since I was 9.  I started on 4 shots a day, down to 2 a day, and when the doctor told me life would be better on a pump I held off as I was used to giving shots.  Well my HBA1C's are now in the 6-7's and I ave NEVER been healthier.  You will live longer, avoid complications, have a more normal life. Tell your mom to start giving herself shots everyday if she doesn't get it or ask her if she would like to have you live as long as possible. That should help!  You would love it.  You can look me up and Twitter.  I am "FitnessBabe" and you will see what I do and how I look after living so far with diabetes for 32 years.  I am proof a pump is AWESOME!


(figure skater girl) #14

the pump is amazing! it gives you reminders to test your blood sugar, you dont have to worry about writing all you blood sugar results and insulin dose in a log book because you download it to the computer, way less needles, it calculates the amount of insulin you need...


(Monique H) #15

[quote user="Heather Cole"]

Unfortunately I don't have an endo:(, I have to get referred to one and they will only refer me to one if I have serious complications or am an unusual case.  I took her to an appointment with a nurse at the education centre here, and all she got out of it was it's a different way to administer insulin, you have a way to administer insulin, therefore an expensive machine to do it for you is not necessary..  She refuses to go to the sessions put on by the pump companies because she thinks by talking to a salesperson I am getting a one sided view because they just want me to buy their pump.

[/quote]

Hmmm.  I'm curious where you are and who provides your insurance.  We were referred to an endo the day after our son was diagnosed (a ped endo, no less), and we've been told that the insurance co's will not consider approving a pump until 1) after honeymoon and 2) you are showing tight control of your BS.  We were told a pump runs about $6,000, so the insurance companies want to be sure you're an excellent candidate before approving it.  Also, we'll have to go through some pretty extensive training classes before even getting one, to be sure it's going to be "good fit". 

So, just a suggestion, would your mom be willing to come onto this site and talk to folks who have been on the pump for a while?  Get first-hand information about how much more valuable a pump would be for protecting your long-term health?

Mo

 


(figure skater girl) #16

i never had to do any classes before going on except for the actual training session. i had to read some books before but it was very few, most of them just recomended. and the insurance was pretty easy i think. they should be covering cgms too because they are supposed to cover any diabetes glucose testing supplies which my mom says is a cgm