How do you manage the mental effort?


(Laura) #1

Hi guys! I’m a relatively new member here, though I’ve had diabetes for almost 10 years. I was diagnosed in 5th grade, and within a few years I was the primary caretaker for my diabetes management. I’ve never quite been able to escape the idea that my diabetes is a burden, and so I’ve pushed it out of sight and out of mind from the people around me. Now I’m a junior in college and I’ve created an environment where I’m really the only one who knows how to take care of my diabetes (even though it feels like I’m guessing most of the time). I know that this is pretty normal though. Through high school and during my first two years of college I let my control slip a lot. Especially in college there were periods where I would almost ignore that I had diabetes all together. Recently though I’ve been putting much more effort in. I’m on a cgm, and my A1c has reached 6.7. I’m feeling better overall obviously, but there are some new issues now. I moniter my cgm almost obsessively and watching my bg going up and down constantly drives me absolutely crazy. My blood sugar never seem to want to cooperate. I tend to overcorrect due to a fear of being high. The biggest thing is that the amount of mental energy I’m putting on to control is leaving me in a state of near constant burn out. I’ve noticed that as I put more time and energy into control my grades slip. I don’t have enough room in my head to be a good diabetic and a good student. I used to get deans list consistently- now I’m failing classes. I don’t have enough energy left over to do things I need to be doing. Also, now that my bgs are regularly in a healthy range I feel pretty awful when I’m high or low, whereas I used to function fine. How do you balance everything? I don’t have enough brains or energy to keep up with everything.

TL;DR as my A1c gets lower so does my gpa- help.


#2

I’ve been preaching to educators and doctors for years on Mental Health and Type 1 Diabetes. It always seems to fall on deaf ears.

I wish I could give you some sure fire ways to work through this, but out of my 40years of being Type 1 I’m still clueless. That’s why I reached out and found this site. I was actually trying to find local support groups just for Type 1’s. Unfortunately I can’t find any.

All I can say as lean on others here, seems to be a wide community of us and venting always seems to help. So all I can really say is to Endure. Endure the highs and lows and all that it comes with and just keep pushing forward.

Maybe, hopefully one day we will see a cure. At least you’ve got a 6.7 a1c and that’s great for a Type 1 imho. Your a junior so you where doing good for years. So, just get back to what you where doing and Endure. Because running as a burn out with this disease is exactly what it is, it kicks our butt’s every second of every day and it never lets up.

Wish I could be more helpful but this is just the plain reality of this disease.

I’m hoping for myself that this community will get me back in the game, because I too am a burn out. So from one burnout to another, lets just keep our heads up and push on.


(Deborah) #3

Hi there! I completely agree with Glycem- lean on others! My dietician is also type 1 and she once told me it takes a village. I was type 2 for 6 years and nearly overnight my disease changed to type 1 (also referred to as LADA or late onset). I was 27 years old…recently out of a terrible relationship and just starting to date an amazing man. This happened about a month into our relationship and it was overwhelming! From one week to the next I went from managing with diet and exercise to being on a CGM and needed insulin. I had lost a lot of weight during that time so when I started the insulin, I gained about 20 healthy pounds. Everyone said I looked much better. BUT the new weight plus the new diagnosis was just SO MUCH to handle! I had plenty of breakdowns (and sometimes still do) but what I came to understand is that I CAN and SHOULD ask for help, guidance and support. Diabetes is a full time job but those who support us can help.

Fast forward 2 years- my A1C is consistently around 6.4, I just got married (to that amazing man that stood by me from the start) and diabetes fits into it all. We refer to Dexcom and Ominpod like they are members of the family :smile: You’ve got to approach it that way or it can sometimes drive you nuts. 2 years ago I never believed I would be married and prepping to have a baby…especially with diabetes! I still have highs and lows but I’ve found that if I celebrate accomplishments like good A1C or getting my dose accurate with pizza, it makes the disease as a whole easier.

Celebrate how good you’re doing…you really are doing great! If you can, reach out to a dietician who also has the disease (they are very active in that profession). Clue people into the disease and you’ll find that people will support you and be amazed at how strong you are to endure the disease! My husband spoke of it in his wedding vows, he was so inspired.

Oh, about looking at the CGM- I think this will subside as you settle into steady numbers more frequently. I found that a pump has made my numbers more steady with less fluctuations.

Good luck to you! You’re doing great :blush: