Newly diagnosed son T1D


(Chasity) #1

Hi everyone,
My name is Chasity. I have 2 kids, Elizabeth 4 and Cody 9.
My son Cody was diagnosed July 30th of this year. I feel like that day is burned into my brain, seeing my son so weak, so this, rapid breathing, unable to speak, should I continue… We were blessed to have a wonderful ER doctor and nurses The moment the doctor walked up to me and told me my son was T1D you could have pushed me over with a feather. If it hadn’t been for a friend that just happened to be there I would have fallen. My husband was on the phone with his parents when we got the news and I had to tell him. Cody was DKA and the doctor said he had to be flown out to the closest children’s hospital. That was one of the hardest thing I have ever done, putting my child on a helicopter all alone. (not enough room for a parent)
We came home packed a bag for Cody and I, kissed and loved on my daughter as much as I could and then drove the 2 hours. The longest two hours of my life.
That’s basically a summary of what happened but every since that day our lives have revolved around sugar checks, highs and lows, insulin, working on getting a Dexcom. Am my emotions all over the place. I find myself thinking about diabetes all day long. I hope I’m no the only one?!?!
I sure would love to connect with another parent that understands how I feel.


(Wendy Spencer) #2

Hi Chasity
Cody’s diagnosis sounds so scary. My daughter was diagnosed when she was 11 (she is now 14) and I can certainly relate to feeling overwhelmed with emotions, fears and confusions. As parents we just want the best for our children and to keep them safe, and something like T1 really challenges our ability to do that. Children are pretty resilient though - Kate manages her diabetes really well now, and has always done all her own testing and injecting. I am so glad the medical team were helpful - it makes such a difference to know your child is in competent, caring hands. So no, you are not alone , and it is great that you want to connect with others. Best wishes to you and your family.


(joe) #3

hi @Chas81,

I get it. Sorry there is so much to learn and get accustomed to. I hope you have access to ped. endo’s and a CDE as they will be a great help the first year. Nothing is going to take this away but I can tell you that the whole thing gets to be more routine the more you learn about it. There might be a JDRF chapter near you for more local support, and the web site has a “Resources Tab” that has many useful links.


(Chasity) #4

Thank you, yes my son is blessed to have a great endocrinologist and CDE. They tell me all the time to call them no matter what.
I just found out today that there is a JDRF office close to where I live. Cody received his “Diabetic Rufus” today and it had a lot of info for us to read as well.


(Chasity) #5

Thank you so much for the kind words.


(Sambat7) #6

I totaly feel for you as my son was diagnosed at age 6.5 and I felt like my whole life was about that. It sometimes gets overwhelming but eventually life settles into a new normal and you’ll start thinking about other things besides diabetes . My son is now 12 so some things are easier , some aren’t … always remember to save some time in the day or week for yourself !!


(Rachel) #7

Your story is heartbreakingly familiar. I have been a type one mom for 15 years. There are new challenges all the time, but you will be great. Biggest thing for you to remember, you are not alone! We are all in this together! Best wishes!!


(Joel) #8

Hi @Chas81, you’re definitely not alone. Despite being a nurse, I didn’t put my son’s symptoms together until my wife had already taken him to urgent care, at least a month after his first symptoms (looking back at it all). My son had to be transferred to a Childrens hospital over an hour away, and I can tell you, I’ve never followed anyone so closely in my car. During our first follow up appointment we met another nurse who had a very similar experience, and her husband is a doctor.

I’m glad to see you have been getting the professional attention you need from your son’s team of people. Now it’s your turn, eh? We’re here, feel free to msg me.


(patel41480) #9

Chastity, I’m sorry you had to go through that. I would never wish this on anyone. Yes your going to worry. You’ll learn to keep snacks in your purse for your son, in the car, and anywhere else he needs to get to them. He’ll understand that he can have a amazing life if he is taught how to manage his diabetes (that will come with time. Probably right before the teen years, though.) And amazing advances are constantly being made. Your daughter will also learn to look for the signs. ( it may be crying, sweating, slurring words, or just being hungry. Hunger usually does not come with a low.)
I was diagnosed when I was 3. I don’t know any thing different. And that’s iokay. It just is.
Good Luck! Let us know if you need any help!