Oh no... TRACK!


(dbtc483) #1

I signed up for track because I love to run and do sprints. But I have a problem... My blood sugar!!!! What do I do? My energy catches up, not quite that fast. Usually when I am asleep or before I go to bed! Now I will be extreamly tired in the morning! Track practice is every day after school until 5:30! My mom says I can't quit this sport. It hasn't started yet but I am not sure what to do! HELP!!! Any suggestions?!?!?!?!

P.S. I also have the pump, OmniPod.


(hcole) #2

Make sure you eat enough before you practice, I find running and other intense cardio really brings my blood sugar down quick.  Check your blood sugar lots during practice, so that when you get to a meet you will have a good idea of what your blood sugar will do in a race.  As for the energy, I find exercising usually brings my energy up.  At first it makes me more tired, but after a week or two of doing it, I find that I have more energy overall during the day.  Good luck:)


(bsum) #3

I did track all throughout high school..I was more long distance so I was doing activity for a longer period of time, but I would always test before practice and eat if I had to.  I tried to have cheese, peanut butter, or something else with a lot of fat and protein to keep my sugars stable throughout the length of practice.  A little bit of juice helped right before I ran just in case, but as Heather said just keep testing as often as needed to see how the exercise is affecting your body.  On meet days you won't need to eat as much because you'll only be running for a little bit.  The rest of the time you'll be stretching, relaxing, etc. 

Stick with it and in the end you'll have no regrets.  I loved track it's a great way to get some exercise and see your friends at the same time!  And yes, believe it or not, the extra activity will give you more energy in the long run as your body gets used to it.

ps-what events do you plan on running?


(heythere_emmy) #4

hey, i've got the same concern as you- i'm debating running track for my school this year but i have no clue what it's going to do to my numbers.


(Trevor) #5

I saw your post on the OmniPod. I saw some details on their site about different basal insulin periods. My personal suggestion is, if you're not using that already, then investigate the manual and the process for setting those up. Identify one of them as "Track Day" or a series of them as such, and calculate out a basal amount that's lower than your other days. The lower insulin level on track day will allow whatever supplements you eat to be more effective and the activity to be less effective for dropping your sugars.

Remember. Diabetes is a balance between insulin, activity, and food.

Insulin is a -ve. Activity is a -ve. Food is a +ve.

Blood Sugar Change = Activity + Insulin + Food

Is your Blood Sugar Change negative? Increase food. Decrease activity. Decrease insulin.

Is your Blood Sugar Change positive? Decrease food. Increase activity. Increase insulin.

Is one of the three factors increasing? Change the others to accomodate.

You want that Blood Sugar Change to work out to as close to 0 as you can (don't bother trying to work out the units, it's an illustration lol). Don't ignore changing your insulin, because it makes it so much easier. Besides, I can definitely say that a good workout will cost me several sandwiches and a bottle of orange juice worth of food, and not everybody's stomach is that big.


(OmniUser) #6

I say to take advantage of the way you BG levels will come down and use it as energy. Make sure to eat what you thing will bring down your BG level to normal again. But eat right before you start running so you dont go high.


(Trevor) #7

[quote user="Cesar"]

I say to take advantage of the way you BG levels will come down and use it as energy. Make sure to eat what you thing will bring down your BG level to normal again. But eat right before you start running so you dont go high.

[/quote]

I'm with Cesar. Complex carbs will not take effect fast enough, and they'll take longer to wear off, leaving you high blood sugar prone later. Simple sugars like juice and such are great because they'll activate quickly and burn out fast. Make sure you have SOME complex carbs, though, because if you miscalculate a little, your peak will become a valley in short order. The small amount of complex carbs (crackers, maybe a granola bar) will give you a bit of a safety net.


(OmniUser) #8

[quote user="Trevor"]

I'm with Cesar. Complex carbs will not take effect fast enough, and they'll take longer to wear off, leaving you high blood sugar prone later. Simple sugars like juice and such are great because they'll activate quickly and burn out fast. Make sure you have SOME complex carbs, though, because if you miscalculate a little, your peak will become a valley in short order. The small amount of complex carbs (crackers, maybe a granola bar) will give you a bit of a safety net.

[/quote]

Agreed, this will make sure (for the most part) that your BG stays in the SAFE zone. Peanut Butter contributes for Carbs to be processed slower. Careful when you eat it, just in case you do get a low you dont process it slowly, you want for it to work fast.