OneTouch UltraMini


(Anonymous) #1

So I got the OneTouch UltraMini a few months ago, and I can't seem to figure out if there's the option to look at your average blood sugar on it. There is on all my other OneTouch meters...
If anyone knows, it would be a huge help. Thanks!


(A-D) #2

Alyssa,

Unless/until you download it to your PC - I think I have bad news... :(

I reviewed the manual because you piqued my curiosity - I don't see any way to do it on the meter itself.  Seems silly - 500 results - no brains?

I know it's not the answer you wanted...  Maybe someone's found a magic key-combo?

A-D


(ruthyhill) #3

No, there is no average.  Like the previous person who posted, I was intrigued by your comment and actually went to search for my UltraMini.  I already had one test so I tested again and only the history showed up!  I threw away the manual when I bought it, but saw parts of some advertsing video on youtube (I know, I'm bored!) and the man only shows how to see the daily readings but no averages.

I suppose the only intent of this meter in particular is if you're going out and don't want to carry around a huge bulge, and then use your "primary" meter afterwards...

Hey, at least the meter was free, right?  :)

Take care,

Ruth


(Billy) #4

Where do you get the software for that? I have 3 One touches, 2 small ones, the mini, and a bigger one, (dont know the name of the bigger one is right now) but they are all one touches.


(Anonymous) #5

Ah, oh well. Thanks, though, to everyone who answered.
I was just hoping I could find my average, put it into that converter on that spiffy :) web site A-D posted (ie mg/dl to mmol/L), and see how close I was to my targeted A1c.
Good to know, though, and thanks especially much for taking the time to watch videos and look it up in the manuals! I appreciate it tons!


(Billy) #6

so how do u find out your a1c and what is it?


(A-D) #7

Billy,

 

The A1c is a lab test, the full name of which is HbA1c.  The test measures the glycated hemoglobin that you have in your blood. Glycated hemoglobin forms in red blood cells when blood sugar (glucose) attaches to hemoglobin in your blood.  This test will be done with the rest of your labs by your doctor.  Because your red blood cells only live about 90 days it gives a good average glucose related value over a 90 day window. 

 

I have also read that because of the cycle in the way cells die off and because of the way the test is done it is weighted a bit toward your most recent numbers.  The reason it is important is that the A1C numbers seem to have the best direct correlation of any lab information to tell us our likelihood of developing the long term complications of diabetes.  Most endocrinologists will run this test either every 3 months or every 6 months depending on their patients, focus and philosophy.

 

A non-diabetic will have a range between 4.0 and 6.0.

 

I guess the shorter answer was: sugar bonds to blood and they measure it… LOL

 

I am have never formally studied any biology or bio-chem or medicine so if anyone steps up and says “that bit’s wrong –“ they are probably right!  This is the best I can explain from what I’ve read and heard, hopefully I helped.

 

Cheers!

 

A-D 


(figure skater girl) #8

[quote user="A-D"]

The A1c is a lab test, the full name of which is HbA1c.  The test measures the glycated hemoglobin that you have in your blood. Glycated hemoglobin forms in red blood cells when blood sugar (glucose) attaches to hemoglobin in your blood.  This test will be done with the rest of your labs by your doctor.  Because your red blood cells only live about 90 days it gives a good average glucose related value over a 90 day window. 

 

I have also read that because of the cycle in the way cells die off and because of the way the test is done it is weighted a bit toward your most recent numbers.  The reason it is important is that the A1C numbers seem to have the best direct correlation of any lab information to tell us our likelihood of developing the long term complications of diabetes.  Most endocrinologists will run this test either every 3 months or every 6 months depending on their patients, focus and philosophy.

 

A non-diabetic will have a range between 4.0 and 6.0.

 

I guess the shorter answer was: sugar bonds to blood and they measure it… LOL

 

I am have never formally studied any biology or bio-chem or medicine so if anyone steps up and says “that bit’s wrong –“ they are probably right!  This is the best I can explain from what I’ve read and heard, hopefully I helped.

[/quote]

 

I remember from 3 months ago when doctors explained the a1c test to me and stuff about it and what you wrote down is right from what was explained to me.


(JamesChambers) #9

Billy,

The software and the cable to connect it to your PC is free if you call the company (the number should be in the manual), or you can use the computer at your local clinic.  If they have D care facilities at the clinic chances are they will have a One Touch config running for you to use free of charge.

Cheers,