Second DKA in 9 months...needing to change something!


(Jaimie) #1

I’m a college student and for the past couple years, I’ve been trying to get my diabetes under control. After being in DKA last week, for the second time in 9 months, I decided that something need to change. The first two things that I need to change, are checking more and giving insulin. But what I’ve been noticed is that I get busy and forget or I’m around people and I’m afraid of someone seeing me. I need to change but I don’t know what to change.


(joe) #2

@Joneerose hi Jamie, when my niece was in college 3-4 years ago, there was a college support group - they all had t1 and they took care of eachother. maybe there is something like that.

look i get the shame, but it isn’t real. what is real are the headaches and puking from dka. that’s very real. you can decide to do something different any time you want to.

you can avoid dka by just taking your long acting and eating low carbs. you can avoid dka and have decent blood sugar by taking long acting and bolusing for carbs. the way you tell is by testing. this ain’t the first time you are hearing this so my question back is: what’s stopping you right now?


(April) #3

Hey Jaimie, I’m April and I went through pretty much the same thing last year. I was away at college and went into DKA three times in one year. I recognized that I needed to change in terms of my care. One thing that helped (and also was pretty annoying at times) was communicating with the diabetes educator in my endo’s office, more often. She helped keep me keep my numbers in check without having to always go into the office. I also started just checking more, giving more insulin, and taking it before meals instead of after; it’s tough and frustrating and I still forget sometimes, but you just gotta remind yourself that it’s what’s best and you don’t want to end up in DKA again.


(Amanda) #4

It’s rough, it really is.

If you’re doing individual injections, is there any way you can get on pump therapy?

Other than that, see if you can find a support group at your school. Or a friend who is willing to kind of help you along. Support is very important.

Honestly, most people I met in college were super cool and understanding about my having to poke my fingers and give injections and whatnot. And they always had questions and wanted to be helpful.


(Michelle39) #5

Hi Jaimie, my parents of a 12 year old daughter and she used to get dka quite often and what I found out that helps is to give her water and have her drink plenty of it lower her carbohydrates to at least 45 grams per meal along with giving the proper insulin and instead of drinking sodas juices Etc I buy her Crystal Light and she puts them in her water cuz they’re sugar free. Also it’s good to get into the habit of checking your blood glucose and taking your insulin in a timely manner this also helps to keep down dka. Hopefully this was helpful.