Significant medical development


(Sal) #1

To put this in perspective, this means that medical scientists now have a live way of testing and experimenting with blood vessels.

If they can find a way to repair blood vessel damage, we could be looking at massively reducing diabetic complications.


(Bill) #2

@Zale,

I took the time to read the original research. Interesting stuff. I’m not so sure what the mice thought about having “human tissues” growing inside them. That will be a bit of an ethical wrinkle to iron out. But they’ll get it done.

The issue of the vascular basilar membrane thickening has been around for a very long time. Our only “defense” against such is careful and consistent blood glucose management. For now that appears to be our only tool to use.

It will be interesting to see where they go with this. Thanks for posting.

Bill


(Dennis J. Dacey, pwD) #3

Hi Sal @Zale, that really is a good news - I wonder if that had been available 52 years ago when my eyes were bleeding if I would have dared have new vessels implanted. Instead I opted for LASER photocoagulation which was successful.

Now with new blood vessels, what next. A few years ago our daughter discovered how to make peptides in the lab [her process confirmed by other University labs] and I volunteered to have her use CRISPER Cas to implant them in me - she refused. She is now at a later stage in development awaiting other labs to confirm her work; she expects it will be another 3 to 5 years before she knows if her theorem is workable. Time, time, time ….