T1d awareness month and "coming out"


#1

So a while ago a friend posted on his Facebook a whole spiel about diabetes, and I wrote to him that he was very courageous to put publicly out there that he had diabetes and I wasn’t ready to come out yet.

Turns out, he doesn’t have diabetes but wanted to show his support.

Since then, my publicly saying I have diabetes has been on my mind. I can count on my two hands the number of people who know I’m diabetic, and on less than 5 fingers that I’m t1d.
Since the kick off of t1d awareness month, it’s been toying on my mind and want to make a video about it.

So my question is:
As t1d, What would you like to tell “normal” people about t1d?
What would you like them to know?


(Danie) #2

Hello!
I have also been thinking about what I would like people to know as a response to Diabetes Awareness Month, and for me the biggest thing is self-awareness. I was exepriencing symptoms for two years before I was diagnosed I was in awful condition. But I had never been taught to question if theses experiences are normal, or if they should be concerning. I though that getting older meant getting tired and uncomfortable and going to the bathroom all the time, so I just accepted what I was feeling. If I had been educated at a younger age to really listen to my body and stand up for myself when I knew something was off, I could have avoided DKA and saved my nervous system a lot of trauma. So I use this month to open the conversation with people about validating our experiences, learning how to talk with our bodies, and reminding myself as well as others not to identify with the way our bodies feel. Does this answer your question?
On a different note, I have had almost the exact opposite experience of being T1D than what you wrote. Everyone at work that I see regularly knows that I have T1D, I even make a point to talk through with my supervisors how to give me an emergency glucagon shot if need be.
I am curious what your experience telling people has been? And what is it about keeping T1D more private that helps you feel comfortable?
These are just wonderings and feel absolutely free not to answer.

With Reverence,
Danie


#3

my close co workers all know (or mostly all know) I have t1d, but they dont understand what it means. even one of them saw me being low, and I told her that if next time she saw me like that again to kindly bring it to my attention as I was hypo and crashign down quickly (I couldnt put 2 words together, I was slurring, when I stood up I almost lost consciousness, I had to hold on to the walls) yet, she said she hadnt noticed anything different about me, and brushed it off) if my other coworkers see me check my sugar or giving myself insulin, they run in the other directions "to give me privacy’ (or maybe they are afraid to catch it too) LOL

one of my closest friend is trained in the medical field, and I was with her once when my sugar kept on climbing up, even after shooting myself with more than 3 times my usual dose of insulin. I was already thinking of calling an ambulance and who would take care of my 6 years old, if I was going into ketoacidosis, and it was clear in her eyes that she had no understanding of what I was going through nor the seriousness of it.

I started writing the points I want to share.
will either share the video here or share my points in writing