Who do you tell?


(bobcatmom) #1

My son was diagnosed a little over a year ago.  He gets mad at me when I tell people that he has diabetes.  I don't tell everyone, just people he comes in contact with, like teachers, coaches, moms of friends, etc.  Anyone whos care he might be in for any length of time.  


(momofrjb) #2

My son is 5 and was diagnosed just 2 months ago.  We haven't had to tell too many people yet.  But, I will tell you this, when he goes anywhere, and plays with anyone, I tell them.  We have a family that we have playdates with at least twice per month.  The first date we had after his diagnosis, I sat the kids down, my two kids, ages 4 and 5, and their kids, ages 3 1/2, and 5 and explained what diabetes is and what the signs are.  Also, I told them if my son gets upset for no reason, that they need to come and get me.  I explained to them that as his friends, they need to understand that his body needs a little different care at times, otherwise, he is the same as before.  That way they don't get scared.  I explained this to my best friends kids, who have a step sister with T1, and they were not even aware of the symptoms.  They actually are part of a family with diabetes and were never instructed on what to look for or what to do if the 8 year old step sister passes out.  Now, as a mother, I am inclined to think that if my son ever got mad at me for telling everyone, that would be easier to live with than having something happen and no one knowing what to do or what the symptoms are.  Just keep explaining that safety is most important!  Better to err on the side of caution, he will thank you in the long run!  Good luck!


(DListMom) #3

Hello,

How old is your son?  My DD was diagnosed when she was 2 and she's 10 now.  It is very important to tell people who are in contact with your son (that's a given).  When my DD turned 5, she would be furious when we tell people about her condition, like asking for sugar free syrup in a diner and letting the waitress know she's diabetic.  We stopped doing that for a while.  We would go to the ladies room to check her BS and shots.  Now she's very comfortable having people know or watch while she checks her BS or when we change her pump site.  Looking back even though she was really young, she was in a stage of denial (so was I), and it's perfectly normal.  I think you will need to be patient and let your son come to it at his own pace - acceptance.  Hope this helps!

~marie~

my website dedicated to my DD and all kids with Type 1 Diabetes  http://www.mylifeonadlist.com


(ameenk01) #4

I don't go out of my way to tell people unless my daughter is going to be playing with their kids or something like that. on the same hand I don't hide it. i have been a T1 myself since age 6 and always wished more people knew so they could at least try to understand it. Courtney is only 4 but since her diagnosis a year ago I try to encourage her to tell people in her daycare, although the staff all knows, what her pump is and why she has it. i hope that this will help her feel like one of the kids when she gets older. unfortunately i was the only diabetic I knew growing up so i always felt kind of out of the normal group.

People tend to notice her pump and ask about it so then i will tell them the details.


(krbwalker) #5

I am so glad you asked this question... My son was diagnosed on Feb. 23rd, 2009 - 3 days before his 12th birthday.  He was so brave in the hospital and handled shots, information, finger pokes extremely well.  He does not want anyone to know... I thought it might wear off - but it has not - a few of his friends are aware (only because I am friends with their mom's and he has been to their homes for overnights)... When we have friends over he goes through any means at all to keep them from finding out... it is making me crazy.  I don't want to "violate his privacy" - but don't know how to come to a compromise on this...  I think it comes down to he is embarassed and worries about their reaction... I try to explain that everyone seems to have something... some of his friends have asthma, others need allergy shots... he just has a pancreas that does not work.  We do not have family with T1 or anyone in his elementary school - he will be going to Jr. High in the fall - and I believe there are 5 students...  I hate this part of it!!!  We keep telling him that it is for his own safety that his friends learn about diabetes... Right now I will be walking in the October JDRF walk without him... hoping that changes.